William Beveridge on Christ’s assumption of a sinless human nature

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Reformed Covenanter

Cancelled Commissioner
... Because it was the perfect nature of man which he assumed from his mother in time, as it was the perfect nature of God which he received of his Father from eternity. And therefore as he in the truth of the Divine nature was begotten like unto the Father in all things, his personal properties only excepted; so in the truth of the human nature he was made like unto us in all things, our sinful infirmities only excepted. He was in all things but sin like unto us; but in sin he was altogether unlike us. For we both in flesh and spirit are naturally full of sin, but he was clearly void of sin both in his flesh and spirit.

For he came to be a Lamb without spot, who by sacrifice of himself once made should take away the sins of the world: whereas had he been guilty of sin in himself, he could never have taken it away from us. … As God, he was infinitely contrary unto sin; and as man, he was perfectly void of it: yea he was therefore as man perfectly void of sin, because as God he was infinitely contrary to it; it being impossible that such things as are infinitely contrary to one another should be ever united together. ...

For more, see William Beveridge on Christ’s assumption of a sinless human nature.
 
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