Why do we sing the psalms?

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Hamalas

whippersnapper
Hey all:

I am going to be doing a brief devotional this Thursday for our small group and I'm planning on teaching Psalm 3. I thought that we might sing Psalm 3 before we look at it so I typed up the words from the Trinity Psalter. Occasionally we will sing a psalm as a church but it is not really all that important in our worship, whether corporate or family. This really saddens me and I think that the lack of importance placed on the psalter comes mostly from our unfamiliarity with the history and purpose of the Psalms. I would like to find a brief, one page explanation on why we sing the psalms,:sing:(not exclusively) to put on the back of the handout I'm doing. It can't be more than one page though. Do you guys know of anything I could use?
 

AV1611

Puritan Board Senior

Hamalas

whippersnapper
Thanks, these are some great resources. Do you all have anything that would fit on one page? I can't seem to find anything less than 3 pages long!
 

joeholland

Puritan Board Freshman
I recently wrote this. The middle of it--the benefits of psalm singing--might fit on one page. Disclaimer--nothing in the article is original to me. It is more a conflation of all that I gathered together after asking the question you ask at the top of this thread.
 

Poimen

Puritan Board Post-Graduate
Here is something I compiled awhile ago. If you wanted it to fit on one page you could simply cite the verses instead of quoting them in full.

PSALMODY IN THE NEW COVENANT

1) The Psalms were sung in the New Covenant community.

• Matthew 26:30 “And when they had sung a hymn, they went out to the Mount of Olives.” (According to Edersheim and Hendriksen, the “hymn” was the Hillel, or Psalm 115-118).
• James 5:13 “Is anyone among you suffering? Let him pray. Is anyone cheerful? Let him sing psalms.”
• Colossians 3:16 “Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly in all wisdom, teaching and admonishing one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing with grace in your hearts to the Lord.”
• Ephesians 5:19-20 “…speaking to one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing and making melody in your heart to the Lord, giving thanks always for all things to God the Father in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ…”

2) Besides Genesis, the Psalms are more often quoted in the New Testament than any other Old Testament book.

3) The Psalms are full of revelations and prophesy about Christ, His work, and His life.

• Luke 24:44 “He said to them, “This is what I told you while I was still with you: Everything must be fulfilled that is written about me in the Law of Moses, the Prophets and the Psalms.”
• Psalm 2:7 “I will declare the decree: The LORD has said to Me, ‘You are My Son, Today I have begotten You.” (cf. Hebrews 1:5)
• Psalm 8:4-6 “What is man that You are mindful of him, And the son of man that You visit him? For You have made him a little lower than the angels, And You have crowned him with glory and honor. You have made him to have dominion over the works of Your hands; You have put all things under his feet…” (cf. Hebrews 2:5-8)
•Psalm 16:8-11 “I have set the LORD always before me; Because He is at my right hand I shall not be moved. Therefore my heart is glad, and my glory rejoices; My flesh also will rest in hope. For You will not leave my soul in Sheol, Nor will You allow Your Holy One to see corruption. You will show me the path of life; In Your presence is fullness of joy; At Your right hand are pleasures forevermore.” (cf. Acts 2:27, Acts 13:35)
•Psalm 22:22 “I will declare Your name to My brethren; In the midst of the assembly I will praise You.” (cf. Hebrews 2:12)
•Psalm 23:1-3 “The LORD is my shepherd; I shall not want. He makes me to lie down in green pastures; He leads me beside the still waters. He restores my soul; He leads me in the paths of righteousness For His name’s sake.” (cf. John 10:11,14).
•Psalm 31:5 “Into your hands I commit my spirit.” (cf. Luke 23:26)
•Psalm 34:20 “He guards all his bones; Not one of them is broken.” (cf. John 19:36)
•Psalm 40:6-8 “Sacrifice and offering you did not desire, but my ears you have pierced; burnt offerings and sin offerings you did not require. Then I said, “Here I am, I have come— it is written about me in the scroll. I desire to do your will, O my God; your law is within my heart.” (cf. Hebrews 10:5-12)
•Psalm 45:6,7 “Your throne, O God, will last for ever and ever; a scepter of justice will be the scepter of your kingdom. You love righteousness and hate wickedness; therefore God, your God, has set you above your companions by anointing you with the oil of joy.” (cf. Hebrews 1:8,9)
•Psalm 69: 9 “…for zeal for your house consumes me, and the insults of those who insult you fall on me.” (cf. John 2:17)
•Psalm 69:25 “Let their dwelling place be desolate; Let no one live in their tents.” (cf. Acts 1:20)
•Psalm 102: 25-27 “In the beginning you laid the foundations of the earth, and the heavens are the work of your hands. They will perish, but you remain; they will all wear out like a garment. Like clothing you will change them and they will be discarded. But you remain the same, and your years will never end.” (cf. Hebrews 1:10-12)
•Psalm 109: 8 “May his days be few; may another take his place of leadership.” (cf. Acts 1:20)
•Psalm 110 “The LORD says to my Lord: “Sit at my right hand until I make your enemies a footstool for your feet.” The LORD will extend your mighty scepter from Zion; you will rule in the midst of your enemies. Your troops will be willing on your day of battle. Arrayed in holy majesty, from the womb of the dawn you will receive the dew of your youth. The LORD has sworn and will not change his mind: “You are a priest forever, in the order of Melchizedek.” The Lord is at your right hand; he will crush kings on the day of his wrath. He will judge the nations, heaping up the dead and crushing the rulers of the whole earth. He will drink from a brook beside the way; therefore he will lift up his head.” (cf. Hebrews 1:13; 5:6 10; 7:17, 21)
 

Hamalas

whippersnapper
I recently wrote this. The middle of it--the benefits of psalm singing--might fit on one page. Disclaimer--nothing in the article is original to me. It is more a conflation of all that I gathered together after asking the question you ask at the top of this thread.
Thanks, I adapted it, (and gave credit) it fits perfectly! Thanks everybody for pulling together these articles, it was very helpful.
 

jaybird0827

PuritanBoard Honor Roll
I recently wrote this. The middle of it--the benefits of psalm singing--might fit on one page. Disclaimer--nothing in the article is original to me. It is more a conflation of all that I gathered together after asking the question you ask at the top of this thread.
Most encouraging - nice job of pulling together and summarizing!
 

joeholland

Puritan Board Freshman
I recently wrote this. The middle of it--the benefits of psalm singing--might fit on one page. Disclaimer--nothing in the article is original to me. It is more a conflation of all that I gathered together after asking the question you ask at the top of this thread.
Most encouraging - nice job of pulling together and summarizing!
Thanks. I owe the PB a big thank you for encouraging some thought down those lines.
 

Glenn Ferrell

Puritan Board Junior
At SRPC we do a fifth Lord’s Day Psalm sing evening service, at which we sing five Psalms or Psalm portions, interspersed with prayer, Scripture reading and sermon. The sermon is on one of the Psalms read and sung. Next one will be June 29th.

At every other public worship service, no fewer than two selections from the Scottish Psalter (1650) are sung, usually interspersed with the two Scripture readings- Psalm, first Scripture reading, Psalm, second Scripture reading. The first and last sung selection are from the Trinity Hymnal, but most often Psalms. We’re about as close to Exclusive Psalmody as any non Exclusive Psalmody congregation one will find in the OPC.

The best argument for singing Psalms is singing Psalms and experiencing the power of God’s word sung corporately in public worship to his glory.
 

mybigGod

Puritan Board Freshman
From my personal experience i have memorized the majority of the Psalms and have a practice of praying them for many yrs. In my personal experience the psalms are given to us so that we might keep our hearts on matters that are important and are eternal.
The psalms are a relief in times of trouble, not in just in experiencing the promises as if we are reminded of Gods faithfulness, but there are all of these workings in our souls that we do not see, that create a working power to persevere in the promises with a longing to return for more. In this sense you will never be bored in prayer.

One of the purpose of praying and meditation of the psalms is that we are not always aware of what is really going on in us as the point of our anxieties, fears, or doubts. What the cries and the promises and the praises do is they are determined to work in us by His power of will to bring out of us the reality of believing by receiving. We are always in need of these different realities of faith, in which we begin to enter His presence through the process of longing graces. Longing graces are longings that are natural to our experiencing regeneration and on to renewal. These spiritual longings are never satisfied on this earth. But these longing are increased. We long to see Him to see Him. We long to know God to know Him. We long to have all of the things that come into our lives to be made straight and whole to make them. God has given us these spiritual desires so that we might increase them so we will not fall into sin and be tempted above that we are able.

The psalms are a place where we can take our anger our problems and all of our inner trials and place them in the care of God. The psalms keep us from thinking that we can take care of these things in our own power. Since He says when we are in trouble we should pray, then there is a perfect convergence of our burden to His care in the experiencing of His power by being reminded of His faithfulness by many different avenues of the accumulation of the experience of His power to longings in our past and present. And by having a certain application of His assurance by our present longing being satisfied. Praying the psalms has an experience as if i went in with a burden and i came out feeling relieved.

My last explanation is very mysterious. Cause i dont think we can take credit as if we were fighting a personal devil by them. But we do not fight against flesh and blood. So these Psalms are given to us for our own spiritual protection and our families salvation and protection. And in this sense there is some very impersonal things that come as a result of these powerful cries. Since we do not know who is the enemies minions, or where the enemy is present, we are offered a fighting that is only ours to resist and His to destroy. Cause when we think of the attack as being in a given situation or a particular person, we have not been rid of our personal anger in the battle. The psalms are the place where we fight by resistance and yet our heads are protected by knowing that He is taking care of all of our troubles in our defensive manner. Now there is the experience of having a very strong resistance or being able to pin the enemy on a regular basis. It depends upon what the test is. And so the test get more and more of a resistance the more we move forward by His work. So the Psalms are not an answer to our getting a victory by our own understanding, but we are resisting knowing that He has a greater vision of what needs to be done and what is going to be best to protect us. He works through the means of prayer.
 
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Augusta

Puritan Board Doctor
I recently wrote this. The middle of it--the benefits of psalm singing--might fit on one page. Disclaimer--nothing in the article is original to me. It is more a conflation of all that I gathered together after asking the question you ask at the top of this thread.
I read this before and didn't realize it was done by someone here on the PB. It is very good. :up: :up:
 
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