Why did God create Man?

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Croghanite

Puritan Board Sophomore
Im looking for the classical reformed answer to this question.

1- Why did God create man when He knew that man would sin and suffer?
This goes with Angels as well.
 

MW

Puritanboard Amanuensis
Im looking for the classical reformed answer to this question.

1- Why did God create man when He knew that man would sin and suffer?
This goes with Angels as well.

Rom. 5:14, Adam was a figure of Christ to come. In technical jargon, an antithetical parallel. Angels are obviously a different matter, and perhaps best left in the "things too high for me" category. In their case, the most we can say is, "for so it seemed good in Thy sight."
 

Gryphonette

Moderator
Not making any claim about this being "the" Reformed...

...explanation, but I've thought it's because morally culpable beings misbehaving is the only way God can display His innate attributes of mercy, wrath, justice, etc.

As the apostle John noted, "God is love", which is telling as that's an attribute He can display all by Himself, due to His triune nature.

But how does a perfectly holy God display justice if there's only Him? Or mercy? There's no reason for mercy in the Godhead, nor justice either. If no one's doing anything wrong, neither of those attributes come into play.

 

bookslover

Puritan Board Doctor
...explanation, but I've thought it's because morally culpable beings misbehaving is the only way God can display His innate attributes of mercy, wrath, justice, etc.

As the apostle John noted, "God is love", which is telling as that's an attribute He can display all by Himself, due to His triune nature.

But how does a perfectly holy God display justice if there's only Him? Or mercy? There's no reason for mercy in the Godhead, nor justice either. If no one's doing anything wrong, neither of those attributes come into play.


The simplest answer, I guess, is that those attributes always existed in God, but they didn't need to be displayed or exercised until after creation and the fall. Their use implies their prior existence.

That'll be $5.
 

gwine

Puritan Board Sophomore
Mark Twain's answer was: "because He was so disappointed with the monkey". But, then, he would say that.

I'm surprised that Mark Twain didn't say that it was because He got tired of talking to His favorite creature, the flies.

From Letters from the Earth
And then, there were the flies. They swarmed everywhere, and persecuted the Family all day long. They were the first animals up, in the morning, and the last ones down, at night. But they must not be killed, they must not be injured, they were sacred, their origin was divine, they were the special pets of the Creator, his darlings.
 

Gryphonette

Moderator
To be sure those attributes always existed; that was actually rather my point. ;^)

They existed but until the creation and fall there was no outlet for them. It'd be like possessing a sense of humor but there being literally nothing amusing so as to elicit even a smile.

A perfectly holy God, consisting of three perfectly holy Persons, would have no reason to "use", if you will, His attributes of mercy and justice. I've thought that while the primary reason for the creation and fall was so the Father can give a people to His Son and His Son can show perfect obedience to His Father, a secondary reason was so the LORD's attributes of mercy and wrath can be exercised and displayed.

Sort of like the line in "Chariots of Fire" when Eric Liddell tells his sister "When I run, I can feel His pleasure!"

Odd thought, isn't it? The only way the LORD can run, jump, and so on is through His people. A good reason to keep one's body from sin ("No, no! I don't want to do THAT!" the Spirit groans), as was pointed out by Paul.

And the only way He can use His attributes of mercy and justice (plus His attendant attributes such as patience and wrath) is with a fallen creation of morally culpable beings.
 

puritan lad

Puritan Board Freshman
[sarcasm]because He was lonely and need our fellowship to fulfill His emotional needs.[/sarcasm]

...at least that's the prevailing view today. One has to wonder how God managed to get along for eternity past without us. :)

This simplest answer is for His own glory. He created us because it pleased Him to do so.
 

Gryphonette

Moderator
Just making sure the "lonely, etc." wasn't directed at me?

For that is in no way, shape or form what I said.

You're absolutely correct that lamentable POV is all too common today (last year at a BSF evangelism class, while being the "target" I asked my partner why God would go to such trouble for us and darned if she didn't say, absolutely seriously, that He's lonely and needs us to be happy), but the LORD giving Himself glory by choosing to display His attributes is scarcely the same thing.
 

VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
The reference to God creating man because he felt lonely was immortalized and has influenced many in our culture through James Weldon Johnson's poem The Creation (1919):

AND God stepped out on space,
And He looked around and said,
“I’m lonely—
I’ll make me a world.”
...
Then God walked around,
And God looked around
On all that He had made.
He looked at His sun,
And He looked at His moon,
And He looked at His little stars;
He looked on His world
With all its living things,
And God said, “I’m lonely still.”

Then God sat down
On the side of a hill where He could think;
By a deep, wide river He sat down;
With His head in His hands,
God thought and thought,
Till He thought, “I’ll make me a man!”
 

Croghanite

Puritan Board Sophomore
"for His glory", It pleased Him to make man. That is the truth.
So the next thing people will say is what about love. Is not God love? How does God love the people whom He sends to hell? It doesnt seem loving to make man knowing that most will be in hell. Well, what about it?
 
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