Who said (c.1658) that which is accurate and best explains edifies most?

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NaphtaliPress

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James Durham cites the below without noting who the learned man was or the book with the preface. It's a needle in a haystack but maybe someone has read something and knows. I get little searching Google or EEBO TCP. Ideas.
"For as the most learned preachings do not always edify most, so neither is it in writing. And though, as a learned man observes in a preface, that which is accurate edifies most intensively and best explains the thing...." {Durham probably means, that which is accurate and best explains the thing edifies most intensively}.
 

NaphtaliPress

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Thanks for looking. The quote needs to be in a preface of a work as Durham indicates. This comes from the body of the Admonition controversy between Whitgift and Thomas Cartwright. It's close content wise but that rules it out I think.
 

NaphtaliPress

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Last chance to find this as I've past this point in my final proof reading of Durham on Revelation v1 (ch 1-3). Any ideas. I've tried searching EEBO and Google. the idea is in a preface some learned man said "that which is accurate edifies most intensively and best explains the thing." I would guess 1600-1660 and possible mid century. It of course could be in Latin.
 

Jeri Tanner

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Is Durham in the process of pointing out that Whitgift's style of writing (I saw it described as pedantic) made it less edifying?
 

Phil D.

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Does Durham use the term "a learned man" elsewhere with specific reference to someone?
 

NaphtaliPress

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Not within 50 and 100 pages prior, and the previous is a "learned doctor" who also was not identified and I had to guess that based on the subject of the Sabbath. Before that was learned Voetius. I'm not thinking either is the same reference. There is a Latin reference just before the above but it is clearly a separate reference and this is a follow up. Here is the full with the notes as they currently stand. The two are not related as seems clear. The Pellican was itself though identified not an easy look up either, though just took time.
And it is observed in Vita Pellicani,[1] as swaying him to publish his writings, though not accounted (by himself at least) to be of accurate learning, that, mediocriter & simpliciter scripta, mediocriter doctis placitura videns, & quod illorum major sit copia, quam, eximie doctorum, gratificari potentibus voluit. For as the most learned preachings do not always edify most, so neither is it in writing. And though (as a learned man observes in a preface)[2] that which is accurate, edifies most intensively and best explains the thing; yet often, what is more popular edifies most extensively and proves profitable to many more who are but of ordinary reach.


[1] . De ortu, vita et obitu D. Conradi Pellicani (1581). See Melchior Adam, Vitæ Germanorum Theologorum … M DCXVIII (1620; Haidelbergæ: Rosæ, 1653), 295.
[2] . The unnamed learned man and work could not be traced.
 

Phil D.

Puritan Board Junior
Well 2 hours of pursuing a couple of totally random hunches yielded exactly nothing. A true needle in a haystack, especially if as seems most likely it's in Latin.
 

NaphtaliPress

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Yes; that's about what I have in it too and I suspect you are right. Maybe a Latinist can come up with some hunches on what phrasing to use to look, though between OCR errors and the fact fewer works are online may make it half a needle or less in a haystack.
Well 2 hours of pursuing a couple of totally random hunches yielded exactly nothing. A true needle in a haystack, especially if as seems most likely it's in Latin.
 

Phil D.

Puritan Board Junior
I did try searching a couple of possibilities in Latin, but I am nowhere near proficient enough to know all of the possible phrasings, or maybe even the most likely. Add to that the far from accurate search results typically available with scans of old Latin books, and.......
 
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