What authors refute Lutheranism clearly

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WildWolf1

Puritan Board Freshman
I've dipped into both Berkof's and Hodge's Systematic Theologies. I have both in my library. Are there other good authors one should consult like Geerhardus Vos's Reformed Dogmatics. Does he treat Lutheranism in those books. Or besides Systematic Theologies what should one read to get a good grasp of the subject. Many thanks and Happy New Year!!
 

WildWolf1

Puritan Board Freshman
Thanks very much you guys, I look forward to a few more posts and then I'll wrap things up.
 

jwright82

Puritan Board Graduate
I've dipped into both Berkof's and Hodge's Systematic Theologies. I have both in my library. Are there other good authors one should consult like Geerhardus Vos's Reformed Dogmatics. Does he treat Lutheranism in those books. Or besides Systematic Theologies what should one read to get a good grasp of the subject. Many thanks and Happy New Year!!
"Between Wittenberg and Geneva" by Robert Kolb and Carl Trueman is great, just read it. It was great, not a refutation but a kindly and critical engagement between two scholars of their respective traditions. Although per your OP Trueman is far more critical of Lutheranism than Kolb is critical of Reformed theology. Evidently he just prefers to lay out Luther's ideas. Trueman lays the Reformed (he means big "Reformed", not just Calvin but the whole spectrum) position but than always compares/contrasts it with Lutheranism. For what it's worth I enjoyed it.
 

Contra_Mundum

Pilgrim, Alien, Stranger
Staff member
I think probably the Kolb-Trueman book will serve you best as a modern expression of an old debate. It is in the modern idiom, and written for a curious audience. It may not be precisely the finely tuned exegetical, historical, and rhetorical "refutation" you are looking for, but I would get this book in your place.

I got the following book for a steal: https://www.amazon.com/Colloquy-Montbeliard-Religion-Politics-Sixteenth/dp/0195075668

I found it used online, in a bookstore, cost me probably not more than $10. The current low price on the above page is $19 (plus shipping I bet). New is $75, half off the list of $155. That's what top-notch scholarship goes for when university presses roll.

If you want to read a record of the exchange between Theodore Beza for the Reformed, and Jacob Andreae for the Lutherans, this is the book.

From an editorial review:
"The bulk of Raitt's book is an extraordinarily finely honed analysis of the arguments raised by each side in the debate. Raitt is at her best here, deftly describing the fine differences between quite a number of Protestant views of the nature of the sacrament....Raitt shows a remarkable sensitivity to the viewpoints and the strategy and tactics of debate of the participants....The book is a fine contribution to ecumenical dialogue between Reformed and Lutheran churches and should go a long way toward dispelling the myth of the belligerence and divisiveness of Reformed Christianity....A first rate example of traditional church history/history of doctrine at its best."--Sixteenth Century Journal
The Lutherans are our Reformation siblings, the "older brother" and (unfortunately) often disrespectful of his insufficiently docile "younger brother." "You dared to disagree with us!" seems to be a fair sum of how our concerns are most frequently heard by them. They usually don't understand how or why we could possibly depart, and impute perverse motives to us.

But for our part, we should listen respectfully, trying to understand their position. Only then do we truly understand why we are not Lutheran The same can be said for understanding Romanism or other theological systems.
 
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