Thoughts on Street Preaching?

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Craig

Puritan Board Senior
My wife and I had lunch today in the home of one of our families at church...it was a wonderful time.

We discussed many different things, and we also talked about how my wife and I are considering moving in the next year or so. As of late, I'm planning on moving to Toledo...on the other hand, I'm wondering if God is preparing me for ministry...ie. go to seminary. The story is long, but suffice it to say God seems to have been showing me to let go of the cares of this world so I could put my vain pursuits behind me...

The long and short of it, what do you all think of street preaching? Mrs Post (one of our lunch hosts) mentioned street preaching this evening by way of encouraging me to search out my calling. This was a practice of Whitefield, and there could be good opportunity. In fact, there is a park downtown surrounded by liberal churches and many passersby...

Is this a whacko idea? It's crossed my mind in recent months, but the thought strikes fear in me. I'm not planning on doing this unless it becomes clear to me that I should. Any ideas?
 

Scott Bushey

Puritanboard Commissioner
I love open air preaching. I used to be involved in a ministry called "Street Reach". We went to the indigent, homeless and substance abusers. When I was in L.A., I actually went out with Ray Comforts group to the promenade. He reached out to the affluent. Whatever your goal, It can be profitable in many ways. My only concern is follow up. For instance, you give the message and then do what? I like to be able to bring them back to the church I attend. Sometimes there are personal needs; you must have some plan in place to assist, i.e. drug programs, housing, possibly feeding them at the moment. Meeting their immediate physical needs will get they're attention, I promise you.

[Edited on 11-22-2004 by Scott Bushey]
 

Scott Bushey

Puritanboard Commissioner
More thoughts:

We had housing for the homeless all over the country lined up. Drug rehabs were in our loop. We would get food coupons from local supermarkets and buy large subs; I even cooked 8 pans of baked Ziti and brought that out once. Another time I made all these little personal care packs, i.e. soap, combs, tooth paste, etc. On another occasion I bought a whole shopping cart of sneakers I purchased for like $25.00 and gave them out. One guy threatened to beat me up if I didn't give him a pair. He was about 6 foot tall and wore a size 11 sneak; he was fighting for a size 8! He probably sold them for drugs......


[Edited on 11-22-2004 by Scott Bushey]
 

cupotea

Puritan Board Junior
Originally posted by Craig
Is this a whacko idea?

Yes. Those annoying people who stand in parks and scream at everyone who passes by are not helping the Christian cause.
Scott, however, is. What you've done is AWESOME, Scott. That's the type of missionary work people need to do--comforting and serving.
 

BayouHuguenot

Puritanboard Amanuensis
Originally posted by Craig

Is this a whacko idea? It's crossed my mind in recent months, but the thought strikes fear in me. I'm not planning on doing this unless it becomes clear to me that I should. Any ideas?

Its extremely crazy. Paul mentioned "we are beside (acting real crazy-like) ourselves for your sake." Whitefield rejoiced in his journal that he had "offal, food, and pieces of a dead cat thrown at him." Preach on, Preacher!
 

C. Matthew McMahon

Christian Preacher
I am all for street preaching. In fact, preachers who are "wanna be" preachers should get out there on the street and preach a few times. That should be required for candidacy for ministry. You have to think on your feet, rely heavily on the Spirit, know what you are going to say in its entirety extemporanoeusly (i.e. study the night before so that no matter which way you need to go ont he drop of a hat that you can do it confidently), and you are often dealing with a hostile crowd. I don't mean "witnessing" to the local yocals, but get up on a box in the middle of Times Square and preach 10 second sermons to everyone passing by and try to engage them.


[Edited on 11-22-2004 by webmaster]
 

Irishcat922

Puritan Board Sophomore
Originally posted by webmaster
I am all for street preaching. In fact, preachers who are "wanna be" preachers should get out there on the street and preach a few times. That should be required for candidacy for ministry. You have to think on your feet, rely heavily on the Spirit, know what you are going to say in its entirety extemporanoeusly (i.e. study the night before so that no matter which way you need to go ont he drop of a hat that you can do it confidently), and you are often dealing with a hostile crowd. I don't mean "witnessing" to the local yocals, but get up on a box in the middle of Times Square and preach 10 second sermons to everyone passing by and try to engage them.


[Edited on 11-22-2004 by webmaster]
:ditto::amen:
 

JonathanHunt

Puritan Board Senior
I preach in the open air on an infrequent but increasingly regular basis - my elders are starting to get their act together and call for open air preaching on a more regular basis.

We actually have a 'porta-pulpit' which has the name of the chapel and the service times on the front of it, and raises you up a few inches above the people on the street. We preach on the main street (the chapel is off the main street on a side road) outside the local beer garden...

People don't generally stop and listen per se, but there is a bus stop opposite where people wait and so they get to hear. Plenty of people walk by as well.

We generally are there for about an hour, hopefully at least three people preach once or twice each, and if there are sufficient numbers we sing a hymn in between each 'sermon'.

I have always spoken on one of the 'I Ams' from John's gospel. I find that the 'I AM' chosen bears frequent repetition from the pulpit and also that there are many points that can be made referring back to the saying.

We hand out tracts and invitations to the chapel.

If you are considering going out into the open air, I would recommend that you get support from others. Nothing is more useful than having a few 'stooges' to stand and listen to you, and others strategically placed around to hand leaflets and engage in conversation anyone who is willing to talk.

I would also say, repeat scripture as much as you can, and don't be afraid to repeat yourself almost in toto as many passersby merely hear you for a few seconds. Those few seconds may be used of God in His sovereign purpose to save or, solemnly, to condemn.

This is England, of course, and I couldn't judge what it is like compared to the States. Generally speaking people are embarassed and hurry past - very few will even heckle you. I suppose people are more vocal in the old US of A, and also more familiar with churchgoing and 'religion'. I think England now is what America might be like in thirty years time if decline continues unchecked by the hand of God.

JH
 

VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
Originally posted by Cottonball
Originally posted by Craig
Is this a whacko idea?

Yes. Those annoying people who stand in parks and scream at everyone who passes by are not helping the Christian cause.
Scott, however, is. What you've done is AWESOME, Scott. That's the type of missionary work people need to do--comforting and serving.

:ditto:
 

JonathanHunt

Puritan Board Senior
Whilst social work has its place, we should not be ashamed to proclaim the gospel on the streets, possibly (as I think Scott related) at the same time as giving a helping hand.

It is shame that idiots rant and rave at people on the street, but that should not prevent us from preaching decently on those same streets.

I for one believe that the day will come when open air preaching will be classified as a hate crime here in the UK, so I intend to carry on for as long as possible!

JH
 

VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
If street preaching is to take place, I believe it should be done by ordained ministers of the word or perhaps (under church supervision) those studying to become ordained ministers of the word.
 

Scott Bushey

Puritanboard Commissioner
Please tell me practically what should I do at work if one of my colleagues ask me about the hope that is in me?
 

pastorway

Puritan Board Senior
wow - you have to be ordained in order to preach the word or witness to the truth of the gospel? Ah yes, don't talk about Jesus, just invite them to church and let the preacher do it.

the narrow way gets more narrow every day.....

I recomend street preaching for EVERYONE, especially for those going into the ministry. Good testing ground and good experience.

Phillip
 

VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
Originally posted by Scott Bushey
Please tell me practically what should I do at work if one of my colleagues ask me about the hope that is in me?

The Great Commission in Matthew 28 is given to the ordained, but the counsel in 1 Peter 3:15 is given unto all believers. (Preaching - restricted to the ordained; witnessing - given to all believers.) We all can and should respond to such a question with as much or as brief of a testimony as is appropriate given the circumstances and the audience. That's about all the practical application I can give you without more information. I want to emphasize that my objection to applying the Great Commission mandate to the unordained does not extend to the laity having conversations about the gospel with unbelievers. Ultimately, having given one's answer to the question of what hope lies within you, the best thing a Christian can do, I think, is to invite an unbeliever to church where they can hear the gospel preached in a forum that God has ordained and blessed.
 

Scott Bushey

Puritanboard Commissioner
Originally posted by VirginiaHuguenot
Originally posted by Scott Bushey
Please tell me practically what should I do at work if one of my colleagues ask me about the hope that is in me?

The Great Commission in Matthew 28 is given to the ordained, but the counsel in 1 Peter 3:15 is given unto all believers. (Preaching - restricted to the ordained; witnessing - given to all believers.) We all can and should respond to such a question with as much or as brief of a testimony as is appropriate given the circumstances and the audience. That's about all the practical application I can give you without more information. I want to emphasize that my objection to applying the Great Commission mandate to the unordained does not extend to the laity having conversations about the gospel with unbelievers. Ultimately, having given one's answer to the question of what hope lies within you, the best thing a Christian can do, I think, is to invite an unbeliever to church where they can hear the gospel preached in a forum that God has ordained and blessed.

Think about what you are saying here. You are saying that God does not ordain salvations outside of the sanctions you speak of. They are for the ordained only..........It sounds like something Bullinger would say; bordering upon hyper dispensationalism or even hypercovenantalism.

[Edited on 11-22-2004 by Scott Bushey]

[Edited on 11-22-2004 by Scott Bushey]
 

VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
Originally posted by pastorway
wow - you have to be ordained in order to preach the word or witness to the truth of the gospel? Ah yes, don't talk about Jesus, just invite them to church and let the preacher do it.

the narrow way gets more narrow every day.....

I recomend street preaching for EVERYONE, especially for those going into the ministry. Good testing ground and good experience.

Phillip

The view that the Great Commission was given to the ordained ministers of God's Word and not to everyone may be surprising to you but it is the historic Reformed view (cf. Westminster Assembly's Directory for Public Worship). It is consistent with the Biblical understanding that certain responsibilities such as preaching and administering the sacraments are not given to all but rather to ordained ministers.
 

Scott Bushey

Puritanboard Commissioner
Those cited above are within the setting of official worship. I believe the RPW is directed under those conditions. The gospel message is to be shared by all people. God forbid all the missionaries around the world are in error as many if not most, are not ordained.

[Edited on 11-22-2004 by Scott Bushey]
 

pastorway

Puritan Board Senior
indeed...hypersomething

Faith comes by hearing and hearing by the Word of God. We are ALL preachers of the Word. Romans 10 - those sent to preach the good news - are not just the "ordained." Outside of the resposibility for church leadership as elders, there is no distinction between laity and clergy within the Body of Christ. To make such a division strips the so-called "laity" of its duty to preach the Word to any and all as they are able.

The Great Commission, being given to the Apostles, is then given to the whole church!

There seems to be a recurring issue in several threads that the immediate context of a passage limits its application to believers here and now. If this is true then most of the Bible is useless to us (unless we are of course ordained).

When Jesus told the apostles to "Go and teach" we can see that He was telling His whole body, the whole church, to "Go and teach." The NT clearly backs this up.

Phillip

PS - frankly I don't care what the Westminster standards or any reformded history says. I care what the Bible says. There is our authority! And the Bible tells the whole church to preach the word to the world.

[Edited on 11-22-04 by pastorway]
 

VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
Originally posted by Scott Bushey
Originally posted by VirginiaHuguenot
Originally posted by Scott Bushey
Please tell me practically what should I do at work if one of my colleagues ask me about the hope that is in me?

The Great Commission in Matthew 28 is given to the ordained, but the counsel in 1 Peter 3:15 is given unto all believers. (Preaching - restricted to the ordained; witnessing - given to all believers.) We all can and should respond to such a question with as much or as brief of a testimony as is appropriate given the circumstances and the audience. That's about all the practical application I can give you without more information. I want to emphasize that my objection to applying the Great Commission mandate to the unordained does not extend to the laity having conversations about the gospel with unbelievers. Ultimately, having given one's answer to the question of what hope lies within you, the best thing a Christian can do, I think, is to invite an unbeliever to church where they can hear the gospel preached in a forum that God has ordained and blessed.

Think about what you are saying here. You are saying that God does not ordain salvations outside of the sanctions you speak of. They are for the ordained only..........It sounds like something Ironside would say; bordering upon hyper dispensationalism or even hypercovenantalism.

[Edited on 11-22-2004 by Scott Bushey]

I didn't say that God doesn't ordain salvation outside of "sanctions." God works through many different means and circumstances, including good books, beautiful sunsets, faithful witnessing by Christians and -- especially -- the sound preaching of the gospel by ministers of the Word (cf. Rom. 10:14-15; Heb. 5:4). He is able to bring about the salvation of men by any means, but it is in the church particularly that God has given the ministry of His word, outside 'of which there is no ordinary possibility of salvation' (WCF Chap. XXV.II).
 

pastorway

Puritan Board Senior
examples from Scripture of the "unordained" preaching the Word -

Luke 9
57 Now it happened as they journeyed on the road, that someone said to Him, "Lord, I will follow You wherever You go." 58And Jesus said to him, "Foxes have holes and birds of the air have nests, but the Son of Man has nowhere to lay His head." 59Then He said to another, "Follow Me." But he said, "Lord, let me first go and bury my father." 60Jesus said to him, "Let the dead bury their own dead, but you go and preach the kingdom of God." 61And another also said, "Lord, I will follow You, but let me first go and bid them farewell who are at my house." 62But Jesus said to him, "No one, having put his hand to the plow, and looking back, is fit for the kingdom of God."

Acts 8
1At that time a great persecution arose against the church which was at Jerusalem; and they were all scattered throughout the regions of Judea and Samaria, except the apostles. 2And devout men carried Stephen to his burial, and made great lamentation over him. 3As for Saul, he made havoc of the church, entering every house, and dragging off men and women, committing them to prison. 4 Therefore those who were scattered went everywhere preaching the word.

Acts 11
19 Now those who were scattered after the persecution that arose over Stephen traveled as far as Phoenicia, Cyprus, and Antioch, preaching the word to no one but the Jews only. 20But some of them were men from Cyprus and Cyrene, who, when they had come to Antioch, spoke to the Hellenists, preaching the Lord Jesus. 21And the hand of the Lord was with them, and a great number believed and turned to the Lord.

[Edited on 11-22-04 by pastorway]
 

VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
Originally posted by Scott Bushey
Those cited above are within the setting of official worship. I believe the RPW is directed under those conditions. The gospel message is to be shared by all people. God forbid all the missionaries around the world are in error as many if not most, are not ordained.

[Edited on 11-22-2004 by Scott Bushey]

The Great Commission specifically tells those being commissioned to "baptize." In my view, the unordained by not administer the sacraments. Those who are to "make disciples of all nations" are also to "baptize." I find no place in Scripture that divides those responsibilities and indicates that one can preach but not baptize, or baptize but not preach. Ordained ministers of God's Word can and should do both. The unordained should refrain from taking either duty upon themselves until lawfully called to do so.

Preaching and witnessing are two very different things. Confounding the two is hindering this discussion.
 

pastorway

Puritan Board Senior
preaching and witnessing are different?

Originally posted by pastorway
examples from Scripture of the "unordained" preaching the Word -

[
Acts 8
1At that time a great persecution arose against the church which was at Jerusalem; and they were all scattered throughout the regions of Judea and Samaria, except the apostles. 2And devout men carried Stephen to his burial, and made great lamentation over him. 3As for Saul, he made havoc of the church, entering every house, and dragging off men and women, committing them to prison. 4 Therefore those who were scattered went everywhere preaching the word.

Every member of the church that was scattered went PREACHING THE WORD.......not the elders only, not the apostles since the text excludes them, not the ordained only - the WHOLE CHURCH preached the Word.

Case closed.

Phillip
 

VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
More excerpts from Brian Schwertley's article referenced earlier:
===========================================
Third, every example of gospel preaching in the book of Acts is by ordained men. The book of Acts is God´s record of what it means to go. It is predominately a book of action. History (the indicative) explains Christ´s order to go (the imperative). There is the example of the preaching and miracle working of the apostles Peter and Paul. As apostles these men were called, trained, set apart and sent out directly by Christ (cf., Ac. 9:5-6, 15; 1 Cor. 9:1, 17-18; 15:8-9; Gal. 1:12, 15-18). All the examples given in Acts of gospel preaching from people who were not apostles involved ordained men who were evangelists. The first example is that of Stephen (Ac. 6:8-7:53) who was ordained as a deacon (Ac. 6:6). Stephen was a great miracle worker. He "œdid great wonders and signs among the people" (Ac. 6:8). This fact sets Stephen apart from most other believers. The gift of teaching and miracle working was restricted by God to only some believers (cf., 1 Co. 12:29). The next example one encounters is Philip (Ac. 8) who was first ordained as a deacon and then became an evangelist. Lenski writes: "œWe must combine Philip´s preaching with his power to work miracles. These gifts of God made him what has been called an evangelist, a missionary preacher. He was thus more than the ordinary Christians who spread the gospel only as a part of their general Christian calling; yet he and his work remained under the authority of the apostles and of the mother congregation in Jerusalem (v. 14) so that he acted with their approval and as their agent."16


There also is the example of Silas (also called Silvanus) who accompanied Paul on his second missionary journey (cf., Ac. 15:40 ff.). Silas is identified as an elder (Ac. 15:22); an apostle or missionary (1 Th. 2:6) and a prophet (Ac. 15:32). He was actively engaged in an official teaching and preaching ministry (cf., Ac. 15:32; 1 Th. 2:2; 2 Cor. 1:19). Another "œfellow worker" (Rom. 16:21) with Paul was Timothy. Timothy was a teacher (2 Tim. 2:2, 15), preacher (2 Tim. 4:2) and minister of the church (1 Tim. 4:6). He was an ordained teacher who was committed with a special trust (1 Tim. 6:20; 2 Tim. 1:14). Another example is Barnabas. Barnabas was a prophet and teacher (Ac. 13:1) who was commissioned by the church for missionary work and sent out (Ac. 13:2-4). Therefore, he is referred to as an apostle or missionary (Ac. 14:14). Barnabas´ cousin John Mark (cf., Col. 4:10) was also an evangelist. He served with Paul on his first missionary journey, with Barnabas in Cyprus and also wrote the gospel of Mark.

If one examines the evangelists mentioned in the New Testament it appears that they were chosen from among men who were already ordained either as deacons or elders. Although there was an overlapping of function in the teaching offices (e.g., Paul refers to Timothy as an evangelist and an overseer [2 Tim. 4:5]; Peter the apostle refers to himself as a "œfellow elder" [1 Pet. 5:1], etc.) Paul lists evangelist as a distinct office in Ephesians 4:11-12, "œAnd He Himself gave some to be apostles, some prophets, some evangelists, and some pastors and teachers, for the equipping of the saints for the work of the ministry, for the edifying of the body of Christ." An evangelist is someone who primarily was sent out to preach the gospel in new areas; who would then (in conjunction with the apostles and other established churches) work to organize new congregations in those specific areas. Once the new congregations had the oversight of a pastor and elders (cf., Tit. 1:5) the evangelist would move on to other new territories. The evangelist was an ordained servant because his task involved far more than witnessing. It concerned teaching the whole counsel of God or all that Christ had commanded. They were involved in "œequipping the saints for the work of the ministry" (Eph. 4:12).

Fourth, fulfilling the great commission involves the administration of the sacraments (baptism and the Lord´s supper). The Bible teaches that only lawfully ordained ministers of the word are to administer the sacraments. Ministers are shepherds appointed to feed the flock of God (Jer. 3:15; Eph. 4:11; Ac. 20:28; 1 Pet. 5:2). Part of this feeding involves the administration of the Lord´s supper which is a means of grace. This truth is supported by Ephesians 4:11-13 which names the offices given for the teaching and perfecting of the saints. "œIs not the administration of the sacraments a perfecting of the saints, of the work of the ministry, of the edifying of the body of Christ?"17 Only some are appointed to such a task. Furthermore only ministers of the word are referred to as "œstewards of the mysteries of God" (1 Cor. 4:1), "œand there is nothing which more properly belongeth to the ecclesiastical stewards than the dispensation of the sacraments."18 Gillespie writes: "œWe have clear and convincing examples in the New Testament, that the sacraments were administered by public ministers, called and appointed thereunto, as baptism by John (John i. 33, "˜He hath sent me to baptize´), and frequently by the apostles, in the story of Acts. The Lord´s supper, administered by Christ himself (whose example in these things imitable we are bidden [to] follow, who also himself commanded touto poiete; this do); and by the Apostle Paul, Acts xx. 7, 11. So "˜the breaking of bread´ is joined with "˜the apostles´ doctrine and fellowship,´ Acts ii. 4"¦. So that a lawful minister may in faith administer, and the receivers receive from him in faith, the sacraments, having Scripture warrants for so doing; but there is neither any commission from Christ to such as are no church officers to administer the sacraments; nor can there any clear example be found in the New Testament, of administering either the one sacrament or the other by any person who can be proved not to have been a minister lawfully ordained. Therefore such persons cannot in faith administer, nor others in faith receive from them, either baptism or the Lord´s supper."19


All the evidence enumerated above that the Great Commission refers primarily to ordained servants is usually rejected on the basis of Acts 8:1, 4: "œAt that time a great persecution arose against the church which was at Jerusalem; and they were all scattered throughout the regions of Judea and Samaria, except the apostles"¦. Therefore, those who were scattered went everywhere preaching the word." This section of Scripture does not contradict the interpretation that says the Great Commission was given to lawfully called and ordained preachers. After Luke makes the general statement that "œthose who scattered went everywhere preaching the word" he then by the example of Philip the evangelist tells us how the word was spread. The "œthose who were scattered" in verse 4 obviously does not mean every believer without exception (e.g., children, the sick, the elderly, etc.). Some argue that the word translated preach (evaggelizomenoi) in verse 4 does not refer to public proclamation but to personal evangelism. Alexander writes: "œAs he there said that all (except the twelve) were scattered, he now says that all who were thus scattered preached the word. Some would infer from this that none but preachers were expelled; but it is far more natural to understand the verse as referring, not preaching in the technical or formal sense, but to that joyful and spontaneous diffusion of the truth, which is permitted and required of all believers, whether lay or clerical, ordained or unordained."20 Even if this interpretation were true it would not contradict the classical Protestant view of the Great Commission. Everyone acknowledges that believers have an obligation to witness to their neighbors. When discussing the preaching of Philip the evangelist, Luke uses the word kerrusso which signifies a heralding or a public proclamation of the gospel. While all Christians should explain the good news of who Christ is and what He has accomplished to their friends and acquaintances, only ordained gospels preachers are to publicly preach the word and administer the sacraments. The reason there is so much misunderstanding today regarding who is to go is that many people confuse the task of evangelism with the much more comprehensive task of discipling the nations. Discipling the nations involves church planting, the sacraments, an established preaching ministry, church discipline and so on. While all believers should evangelize, only some are called upon to go to foreign lands to establish churches.
 

pastorway

Puritan Board Senior
one word came to mind reading that........priestcraft

I'm done. The Bible has spoken and been rationalized right out of understanding.

[SARCASM]Laity - shut up and don't dare preach the Word - that is your pastors job. You just go to church and be good......and by the way, don't ever obey any Scripture that was not addressed directly to you by title, office, or name. Only do it if your preacher tells you to. He knows better. (hope he preaches in a living language.....)[/SARCASM]

:roll eyes:

Phillip
 

VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
Originally posted by pastorway
one word came to mind reading that........priestcraft

I'm done. The Bible has spoken and been rationalized right out of understanding.

[SARCASM]Laity - shut up and don't dare preach the Word - that is your pastors job. You just go to church and be good......and by the way, don't ever obey any Scripture that was not addressed directly to you by title, office, or name. Only do it if your preacher tells you to. He knows better. (hope he preaches in a living language.....)[/SARCASM]

:roll eyes:

Phillip

Dismissing a Scriptural exposition of the issue at hand with heavy sarcasm is not helpful in advancing the discussion.
 

pastorway

Puritan Board Senior
Neither is poor exposition to try and prove a point that the Scriptures do not make. A clear reading of Acts 8 is enough to say that ANY believer is free and duty bound to preach the Word.

Phillip
 

VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
Originally posted by pastorway
Neither is poor exposition to try and prove a point that the Scriptures do not make. A clear reading of Acts 8 is enough to say that ANY believer is free and duty bound to preach the Word.

Phillip

A clear reading of the entirety of the Word of God makes the clear that preaching is a duty confined to the ordained and witnessing is a duty incumbent upon all believers.

Your failure to interact at all with the earlier exposition speaks volumes.
 

C. Matthew McMahon

Christian Preacher
Originally posted by pastorway
one word came to mind reading that........priestcraft

I'm done. The Bible has spoken and been rationalized right out of understanding.

[SARCASM]Laity - shut up and don't dare preach the Word - that is your pastors job. You just go to church and be good......and by the way, don't ever obey any Scripture that was not addressed directly to you by title, office, or name. Only do it if your preacher tells you to. He knows better. (hope he preaches in a living language.....)[/SARCASM]

Phillip, you have to be kidding. Either that, or you cannot be possibly thinking about the texts referenced.

Priestcraft? No. How about Christ's authority to send ordained men to preach the Gospel?

There is no amount of exegetical hoop jumping that anyone can do to apply the Great Commission to the church in general. No matter what denominaitonal affiliation one has, or what form of church government one believes, it makes no difference. The "karux" in general is a specifically sent ordained man. This has nothing to do with the "general witness" of the church, either by mouth or by silent testimony.

If I could rewrite your sarcasm and make it not sarcasm:

Laity - be sure not to intrude on Christ's authority to send ordained men to preach the Word - that is your pastors job, not yours. You go to church and fulfill whatever giftedness God has placed on you as an integreal part of the body......and by the way, don't ever mis apply any Scripture that was not addressed directly to you by title, office, or name. Only listen to God's gifts to the church, the teachers and preachers he has placed over you. They have been gifted by Him to know how to rightly apply the Word of God to your life.

Philip was an evangelist. Acts 8 records not only the testimony of an evangelist (an ordained man in the church given by Christ) but also miracles that surrounded his witness (liek the apostloic function of testimony + miracle) which demonstrates the uniquesness of the office.

[Edited on 11-22-2004 by webmaster]
 
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