Thomas Brown of Glasgow on praying for the extension of Christ’s cause

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Reformed Covenanter

Cancelled Commissioner
... In the early ages of Christianity, the activity, the devotedness, and the prayerfulness of Christians, were essential to the evangelizing of the world, as needful in the Divine economy as the miracles that accompanied the preaching of the Apostles; and shall these be less necessary now that these supernatural gifts are withdrawn and have ceased—shall their duty be still imperative, and yet their faith fail, their zeal flag, their efforts become feeble, and their supplications faint—shall they relax, shall they intermit, now that Peter ceases to strengthen the brethren and to feed the flock, now that James and John are withdrawn from the field of labour and conflict, now that Paul and Barnabas have ceased to struggle and strive for the cause of Zion’s King? Surely not.

But it may be asked, What can individual Christians do? What can they do? They can pray and cry aloud—they can plead the honour of Christ’s name—they can remember God’s covenant promises, and witness their fulfilment—they can bear in mind what God did in the generations of old, and pray that the arm of the Lord would awake and put on strength, and cause light to arise on the dreary waste. They can urge, with intensity, this prayer, “Let thy kingdom come.” What Christian cannot do this, and what Christian, animated with love to Christ, and convinced of the value of the gospel, and the need of salvation to the perishing sinner, does not do this? ...

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Reformed Covenanter

Cancelled Commissioner
N.B. I have called this man Thomas Brown of Glasgow to distinguish him from the later Thomas Brown of Edinburgh, who compiled the Annals of the Disruption.
 
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