Thomas Boston on the three-fold division of the law

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Taylor Sexton

Puritan Board Senior
This is good. Thanks for sharing.

The thing that frustrates me, though, is that so often these great men, when talking about the judicial law, don't really saw anything about it. They essentially just repeat what the WCF says, almost word-for-word. I want to know what they think it means—both theologically and practically—that the judicial law is not binding, to use Boston's words here, "farther than it is of moral equity." I cannot recall reading a single commentary on the WCF that expounds upon it.

Please understand, this isn't to disparage these men. I just want to know what they think!
 

Reformed Covenanter

Puritanboard Commissioner
This is good. Thanks for sharing.

The thing that frustrates me, though, is that so often these great men, when talking about the judicial law, don't really saw anything about it. They essentially just repeat what the WCF says, almost word-for-word. I want to know what they think it means—both theologically and practically—that the judicial law is not binding, to use Boston's words here, "farther than it is of moral equity." I cannot recall reading a single commentary on the WCF that expounds upon it.

Please understand, this isn't to disparage these men. I just want to know what they think!

He actually says more about the judicial law in volume 1 (pp 257-58). The main reason why many writers do not go into greater detail on this point is that they are often only dealing with the question in passing.
 
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