The Role of Salvation via Christ in Presuppositional Argumentation

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Confessor

Puritan Board Senior
I was thinking about presuppositional apologetics, and why another triune god could not take the place of the Christian God (which would allow for a belief in deism), and I remember reading about this a little in Van Til's Apologetic, but it didn't go that in-depth in the part I read.

It talked about man's natural intellectual failures (such as his persistence to believe things that are not true, etc.), which would indicate that man is in need of some redemption, and then it points to Christ. Does anyone know of a better way to formulate this so that presuppositional argumentation can point to Christ?

:doh:
 

MW

Puritanboard Amanuensis
Does anyone know of a better way to formulate this so that presuppositional argumentation can point to Christ?

Triunity bespeaks personal relationship. God is a society of love. The Deist's commitment to a God personally detached from creation cannot account for the personal element of human existence; which is why Deists tend to be unitarians.
 

Confessor

Puritan Board Senior
Does anyone know of a better way to formulate this so that presuppositional argumentation can point to Christ?

Triunity bespeaks personal relationship. God is a society of love. The Deist's commitment to a God personally detached from creation cannot account for the personal element of human existence; which is why Deists tend to be unitarians.

Thank you. In addition to this, do you know of any ways for men to realize their need of redemption? Van Til makes a big point of everyone's need for a Creator-Redeemer (and of course only the Christian God fits the bill), but I don't know how to present this in a discursive fashion.
 

ChristianTrader

Puritan Board Graduate
Does anyone know of a better way to formulate this so that presuppositional argumentation can point to Christ?

Triunity bespeaks personal relationship. God is a society of love. The Deist's commitment to a God personally detached from creation cannot account for the personal element of human existence; which is why Deists tend to be unitarians.

Thank you. In addition to this, do you know of any ways for men to realize their need of redemption? Van Til makes a big point of everyone's need for a Creator-Redeemer (and of course only the Christian God fits the bill), but I don't know how to present this in a discursive fashion.

One could present this as a question of how various religions present ways to fulfill the covenant of works. Every worldview puts forward a way to make up for the bad that you do and be made right with G/god. Only Christianity says, You cannot get it done and you do not have to get it done. It is the only view that fits with General Revelation.

CT
 

MW

Puritanboard Amanuensis
Thank you. In addition to this, do you know of any ways for men to realize their need of redemption? Van Til makes a big point of everyone's need for a Creator-Redeemer (and of course only the Christian God fits the bill), but I don't know how to present this in a discursive fashion.

Following on from Hermonta's helpful suggestion, it can be pointed out that all human religion seeks to ascend to the Absolute as if man has some natural ability to save himself, but in Christianity alone does God descend to man to do what is impossible for man to accomplish. This is in keeping with His commitment to creation. Jesus Christ is God with us in every sense of the words.
 

Confessor

Puritan Board Senior
Thank you both! Do you think it would be good to point out the deficiencies of mankind no matter what he does, demonstrating the inability to work our way to salvation?
 
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