the Reformers and rebaptism

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rembrandt

Puritan Board Sophomore
Perhaps this has been dealt with in previous threads speaking of the validity of the Romish baptism.

But a bit of a historical question: Luther, Calvin, etc., did not get rebaptized and command converts with the Romish baptism to be rebaptized did they?

If they didn't it seems like this would be powerful historical evidence favoring the view that the Romish baptism is valid.

Rembrandt
 

Puritan Sailor

Puritan Board Doctor
The Reformers (unless you count the Anabaptist's) did not support rebaptism. They felt that Rome though corrupt at the time was still a true church. They also felt that the nature, use, and efficacy of the sacrament was not dependent upon the minister who gave it but upon God, whom they administered it for.
 

Puritan Sailor

Puritan Board Doctor
The Reformers (unless you count the Anabaptist's) did not support rebaptism. They felt that Rome though corrupt at the time was still a true church. They also felt that the nature, use, and efficacy of the sacrament was not dependent upon the minister who gave it but upon God, whom they administered it for.
 

wsw201

Puritan Board Senior
Actually there was a long thread on this issue. You might try a search for RC Baptism or Valid Baptism.
 

A_Wild_Boar

Puritan Board Freshman
If someone were baptized as an infant and grew up a total heathen and blasphemer. If they were to one day be regenerated by the Holy Spirit and saw the truth. What if they wanted to be baptized? Like me I was baptized in a Methodist church by atheist parents. They thought it was traditional. When I became a believer the first thing I wanted to do was go and is baptized and take communion. Even though I was baptized as an infant I still felt as if I neglected my duties for I had no choice in the matter and I still felt lacking in that aspect.

Was it a sin for me to be Baptized as an adult and new convert?

Was my Baptism as an infant valid?

[Edited on 3-6-2004 by A_Wild_Boar]
 

Puritan Sailor

Puritan Board Doctor
[quote:bbb8541a11][i:bbb8541a11]Originally posted by A_Wild_Boar[/i:bbb8541a11]
If someone were baptized as an infant and grew up a total heathen and blasphemer. If they were to one day be regenerated by the Holy Spirit and saw the truth. What if they wanted to be baptized? Like me I was baptized in a Methodist church by atheist parents. They thought it was traditional. When I became a believer the first thing I wanted to do was go and is baptized and take communion. Even though I was baptized as an infant I still felt as if I neglected my duties for I had no choice in the matter and I still felt lacking in that aspect.

Was it a sin for me to be Baptized as an adult and new convert?

Was my Baptism as an infant valid?
[/quote:bbb8541a11]
Your questions will receive completely different answer depending on whether your baptist or peadobaptist. Being a peado, I'll answer from that point of view.

The fact that you were baptized as an infant doesn't mean you had no choice in the matter. In fact, you made your choice when you believed and repented of your sins and called out for God to be your God. That is what your baptism was pointing too. God remained faithful to the promises made to you in baptism. So, there was no need to be rebaptized since the reality of your first baptism was fulfilled. You were set apart by God through the minister and God remained faithful. You chose to own your baptism rather than reject it, even though you may not have understood it that way at the time. Was it sin to be rebaptized? Perhaps. But it was only done once and done out of lack of understanding so I would not hold it against you.

Now be prepared for the onslaught of the baptists :)
 

A_Wild_Boar

Puritan Board Freshman
Thanks. Still seems like it hints at regeneration, but I am probably wrong. Like I said, my parents were and still are unbelievers. If my baptism caused God to regenerate me then does He automatically do that for all Baptised infants? If thats the case, then we should sneak ministers into hospitals and Baptise all the babies we can. (ok it looks like I am the one turning it into a big deal)

I dont know how I had a choice in my baptism when I was a few weeks old, but I guess I have much to learn. thanks for your input.

Waiting to get pounced on by the baptists now. :bouncing:

[Edited on 3-6-2004 by A_Wild_Boar]
 

Puritan Sailor

Puritan Board Doctor
[quote:fafdf1720f][i:fafdf1720f]Originally posted by A_Wild_Boar[/i:fafdf1720f]
Thanks. Still seems like it hints at regeneration, but I am probably wrong. Like I said, my parents were and still are unbelievers. If my baptism caused God to regenerate me then does He automatically do that for all Baptised infants? If thats the case, then we should sneak ministers into hospitals and Baptise all the babies we can. (ok it looks like I am the one turning it into a big deal)
[/quote:fafdf1720f]
Baptism symbolizes regeneration among other things, but it does not cause it. God is the one who regenerates. But baptism sets you apart from the world into the visible church with the hope that at some point you will manifest what is symbolised. Which you did.
[quote:fafdf1720f]I dont know how I had a choice in my baptism when I was a few weeks old, but I guess I have much to learn. thanks for your input.[/quote:fafdf1720f]
You had the choice to either acknowledge what is represented, that God would be your God. Or you had the choice to reject it and officialy leave the visible church for the world.
[quote:fafdf1720f]
Waiting to get pounced on by the baptists now. :bouncing:
[/quote:fafdf1720f]
Me too :)
 

Wannabee

Obi Wan Kenobi
[quote:81ca28f8f7][quote:81ca28f8f7]Waiting to get pounced on by the baptists now. :bouncing: [/quote:81ca28f8f7]Me too[/quote:81ca28f8f7]You know, this is almost irresitable. However, I will resist the obvious comments that we Baptists would make here because you guys already know what we'd say. :duh:

Hey, that means it is resistable... must not be grace :lol::lol::lol::lol:
 

A_Wild_Boar

Puritan Board Freshman
So far I have seen some things that confuse me even more. It seems that because a child was Baptized. God regenerated that child as God said He would. Do I have this right? If a child is Baptized, then God is bound to regenerate the child regardless of the parents standing with God? This is what I feel I am getting told. I had atheist parents who had me Baptized out of tradition and God regenerated me later in life because I was Baptized?

Man I am getting even more confused.

Lets see if I got this right.

1. Parents Baptize infant
2. God later regenrates child because of said Baptism
3. Baptism causes regeneration.

In my case parents were and still are unbelievers. So this is not really a matter. I was later regenerated in life because of something my parents did out of tradition. God fulfilled this because he made a promise to regenerate Baptized children.

How much did I mess that up. (if I did I dont mind being corrected)



[Edited on 3-8-2004 by A_Wild_Boar]
 

Preach

Puritan Board Sophomore
May I suggest that you pick up a copy of Randy Booth's "Children of the Promise". It is a very simple and basic introduction into the subect. It helped me and two other former Southern Baptist friends understand the truth of infant inclusion in the covenant (ie. infant baptism). It is only about ten dollars. You may purchase it from (www.cmfnow.com). And from what I have read here on the board, it seems God is employing that particular book as an instrument of his will.
"In Christ",
Bobby
 

rembrandt

Puritan Board Sophomore
I am still new to the study of the sacraments, but the idea that the baptism does not depend on the standing of the parents, sounds like the "half-way" covenant. And that is rejected right? I've been reading on Edwards, and he rejected it in his church.

Rembrandt
 
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