The Origins of New Testament Christology (Marshall)

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BayouHuguenot

Puritanboard Amanuensis
Marshall, I. Howard. The Origins of New Testament Christology. Leicester, UK: Apollos, 1990. Updated edition.

I. Howard Marshall isn’t merely responding to the question, “Did Jesus Know He Was God?” but also, “Did Jesus have a Christology?” The latter is a far more nuanced claim. In the affirmative, Marshall argues that Jesus applied categories of the Old Testament and Judaism to himself, and that for the early church, the Resurrection gave the impetus for thinking of him as the judging and coming Lord (Marshall 128).

The book is somewhat dated, as John Hick’s work had only recently come out and the Jesus Seminar debacle had yet to emerge. It is valuable, though, in that he summarizes research from Bultmann, Kasemann, and Cullmann.

Marshall points out that “Lordship” language cannot have been a later Hellenistic interpolation, since Jesus was implored “Maranatha,” showing that lordship was found in the Jewish and Aramaic churches (20).

This is an important document in the history of New Testament research but has since been eclipsed by more recent work along the lines of Habermas, Keener, Wright, Blomberg, etc.
 
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