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Sam Jer

Puritan Board Freshman
I just read Scotland's National Covenant, and it seems to explicitly forbid the union of that country with England, as it would cause "such confusion... as this realm could be no more a free monarchy; because by the fundamental laws, ancient privileges, offices, and liberties of this kingdom, not only the princely authority of His Majesty’s royal descent hath been these many ages maintained, also the people’s security of their lands, livings, rights, offices, liberties and dignities preserved", as well as religious concerns.
Am I reading it right?
 
There was plenty sentiment around that time that as the Reformation had gone further in Scotland than in England, political union of the two nations would not be in Scotland's religious/moral interests.

On the other hand, around the time of the 2014 independence referendum some people cited the Solemn League and Covenant as reason why the union should not be ended. It is less plausible these days either that England and Scotland are particularly different in social attitudes, or that England would drag Scotland down religiously/morally more than vice versa.
 
There was plenty sentiment around that time that as the Reformation had gone further in Scotland than in England, political union of the two nations would not be in Scotland's religious/moral interests.

On the other hand, around the time of the 2014 independence referendum some people cited the Solemn League and Covenant as reason why the union should not be ended. It is less plausible these days either that England and Scotland are particularly different in social attitudes, or that England would drag Scotland down religiously/morally more than vice versa.

But what about these "fundamental laws, ancient privileges, offices, and liberties" of that kingdom?

I do wonder what people thought about this in 1707, particularly those who held to the covenants being perpetual. I mean people who lived through and survived the killing times must still have been alive at this time.
 
But what about these "fundamental laws, ancient privileges, offices, and liberties" of that kingdom?

I do wonder what people thought about this in 1707, particularly those who held to the covenants being perpetual. I mean people who lived through and survived the killing times must still have been alive at this time.
I'm sure there were a variety of views, as in most political decisions. But of course much of Scots law and religion remained (and remains) on an entirely different basis from English law and the church. The Church of Scotland and Church of England were not united, nor were the two legal systems. Whether Scotland is the better for it these days remains a matter of opinion.
 
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