The Lord's Supper and Baptism

Discussion in 'Credo-Baptism Answers' started by JM, Jan 5, 2011.

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  1. JM

    JM Puritan Board Professor

    If a believer refuses to follow the command to be baptized should they be excluded from the Lord's Supper?

    Thank you.

    jm
     
  2. KMK

    KMK Administrator Staff Member

    This would all depend upon your view of fencing the Table. Is your question directed to those who hold 'closed', 'close', or 'restricted' communion? (Obviously those who hold to 'open' communion would not be in view)
     
  3. JonathanHunt

    JonathanHunt Puritan Board Senior

    Another variation is 'what do you define as baptism'?

    I know what I believe baptism to be, but I am happy to allow sincere believers who hold their infant baptism to fulfill the command to be baptised, to partake. We have an 'open' table, but we would have no hesitation in barring anyone from the table who was openly disorderly. Could that include someone with way-out views, such as denial of the need for any baptism? Difficult.
     
  4. JM

    JM Puritan Board Professor

    The Abstract Of Principles, "Baptism is an ordinance of the Lord Jesus, obligatory upon every believer, wherein he is immersed in water in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, as a sign of his fellowship with the death and resurrection of Christ, of remission of sins, and of his giving himself up to God, to live and walk in newness of life. It is prerequisite to church fellowship, and to participation in the Lord's Supper."

    Was open communion practiced by Calvinistic Baptists in the past? Was it a majority position? I can't seem to find anyone between Bunyan (was he a baptist?) and Robert Hall Jr. From my reading, open communion was more popular in the UK, not so much in North America.

    Thank you.

    jm
     
  5. Herald

    Herald Administrator Staff Member

    I am going to make some assumptions about your question. I assume you're referring to a new believer who, after being instructed on the command to be baptized, refuses. In that case denying them participation in the Lord's Supper would be an acceptable form of church discipline; although it would not be the sum of church discipline. The Lord's Supper requires that we examine ourselves. To continue in open rebellion, even after personal examination, is to be unworthy of the table.
     
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