The imitation of Augustine and the correction of our errors (Prosper)

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Reformed Covenanter

Puritanboard Commissioner
Why, then, should we not approve of this declaration of Augustine in which he corrects his mistake and teaches us after his own example to reform our opinions if we happen through imprudence to have taken to erroneous ones?

Prosper of Aquitaine, Answers to the Extracts of the Genoese in Defense of St. Augustine: Ancient Christian Writers, no. 32, trans. P. De Letter (Westminster MD: Newman Press, 1963), pp 51-52.

Among Christians in Northern Ireland, pig-headedness is one of the main besetting sins. Too many see obstinately clinging to their erroneous opinions as a virtue and admitting that they are in the wrong as a weakness.
 
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Reformed Covenanter

Puritanboard Commissioner
On the same theme, Prosper observes:

We see, then, that there is neither justice nor reasonableness in the conduct of these objectors who preferred the imperfect knowledge of the young Augustine to the mature learning which he built up later by constant and stead progress and perfected by long years of study.

Prosper of Aquitaine, Answers to the Extracts of the Genoese in Defense of St. Augustine: Ancient Christian Writers, no. 32, trans. P. De Letter (Westminster MD: Newman Press, 1963), p. 53.
 
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