The Children the Lord Has Given Me (Is. 8:18)

Status
Not open for further replies.

Scott

Puritan Board Graduate
Isa. 8:18 reads: "Here am I, and the children the LORD has given me. We are signs and symbols in Israel from the LORD Almighty, who dwells on Mount Zion." In the context, Isaiah appears to be speaking of himself and his two children, Maher-Shalal-Hash-Baz and Shear-Jashub.

Hebrews 2 puts these words in the mouth of Christ, though: " . . . So Jesus is not ashamed to call them brothers. 12He says, 'I will declare your name to my brothers; in the presence of the congregation I will sing your praises.' 13And again, 'I will put my trust in him.' And again he says, 'Here am I, and the children God has given me.'"

In Heb. 2 the speaker appears to be Christ (vs. Isaiah in the original context) and the children seem to be Christ's spiritual children, as opposed to Isaiah's physical chidren.

It appears to me that Hebrews is interpreting Isaiah and the account of his children typologically. What do people think about this? How is the prophet Isaiah himself a type of Christ?

Scott
 

Scott

Puritan Board Graduate
Regarding Heb. 2:13's use of Isa. 8:18, here is an excerpt of the Jamieson, Fausset, Brown Commentary, which is hands-down the single best commentary on the books of the Bible that I have read on the subject of typology.
Behold I and the children, &c.--(Isaiah 8:18). "Sons" (Hebrews 2:10), "brethren" (Hebrews 2:12), and "children," imply His right and property in them from everlasting. He speaks of them as "children" of God, though not yet in being, yet considered as such in His purpose, and presents them before God the Father, who has given Him them, to be glorified with Himself. Isaiah (meaning "salvation of Jehovah") typically represented Messiah, who is at once Father and Son, Isaiah and Immanuel (Isaiah 9:6). He expresses his resolve to rely, he and his children, not like Ahaz and the Jews on the Assyrian king, against the confederacy of Pekah of Israel, and Rezin of Syria, but on Jehovah; and then foretells the deliverance of Judah by God, in language which finds its antitypical full realization only in the far greater deliverance wrought by Messiah. Christ, the antitypical Prophet, similarly, instead of the human confidences of His age, Himself, and with Him GOD THE FATHER'S children (who are therefore His children, and so antitypical to Isaiah's children, though here regarded as His "brethren," compare Isaiah 9:6; "Father" and "His seed," Isaiah 53:10) led by Him, trust wholly in God for salvation. The official words and acts of all the prophets find their antitype in the Great Prophet (Revelation 19:10), just as His kingly office is antitypical to that of the theocratic kings; and His priestly office to the types and rites of the Aaronic priesthood.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top