Suggestions to improve the Tolle Lege 1599 Geneva Bible

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VilnaGaon

Puritan Board Sophomore
I use the Tolle Lege 1599 Geneva Bible almost exclusively. In my humble opinion it is the best Translation in existence. However that does not mean it cannot be improved upon. I have a few suggestions
1. Captalize the Tetragrammaton in the OT as LORD so it can be differentiated from Lord. Almost every other Translation does this. It is very helpful in Bible Study.
2. Incorporate relevant maps throughout the Bible like many modern Study Bibles do.
3. Provide the meaning of obscure words in the footnotes rather than at the back of the Bible.
4. Bring back the Family Sized Edition, with its larger type.

If anyone else has further suggestions, please go ahead. :cool:
 

LawrenceU

Puritan Board Doctor
Put it in a decent, and consistent, binding. I don't think I've ever seen a bible targeted toward serious students of the word in a worse binding. For that matter I have rarely seen any bibles in that bad of a binding.
 

DMcFadden

Puritanboard Commissioner
I echo Lawrence. Mine sits on the shelf for historical value and occasional reference. It would be very difficult to use as my regular Bible.

But hey, you guys have spoiled me. My "regular" Bibles now are a premium calfskin ESV, a premium calfskin NKJV (both classic thinlines), and an Allan KJV Clarendon Blackface.

I simply refuse to "use" my ESV Study Bible except in morning devotions with my wife since my puny arms are insufficient to carry that dumbell around with me. (Actually, it might be a great Bible for Rosie the Riveter).
 
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PointyHaired Calvinist

Puritan Board Sophomore
Add the "Arguments" back from the original, and I wouldn't mind an edition with the Apocrypha separated out.

1. Captalize the Tetragrammaton in the OT as LORD so it can be differentiated from Lord.

I don't think they could do "Lord" and "LORD" because the Geneva did not distinguish between Jehovah and Adonai in the OT, though it's a shame they didn't.
 

E Nomine

Puritan Board Freshman
I agree with the OP's suggestions, except #3. I like having the Glossary in the appendix and wouldn't want to see it incorporated with the original 1599 notes.

I wholeheartedly agree with LawrenceU's observation! My Calvin legacy edition fell apart within a few months. I had it rebound, rather than exchanging it for another poorly-bound copy. I DO use this as my regular Bible!

My suggestion for a new version would include higher quality paper and a darker, more consistent imprint. Some pages are too light, and too many pages suffer from bleedthrough.
 

Christian Soldier

Puritan Board Freshman
My suggestion for a new version would include higher quality paper and a darker, more consistent imprint. Some pages are too light, and too many pages suffer from bleedthrough.

That's my biggest complaint with mine. Some pages have incredibly light print. Especially in the notes.
 

C. M. Sheffield

Puritan Board Graduate
Keep it Simple

2. Incorporate relevant maps throughout the Bible like many modern Study Bibles do.

I personally don't like Bibles that do this. It clutters the text. Comprehensive maps in the back of a Bible are a better alternative In my humble opinion.

I prefer the simple beauty of just the text (sacred text, commentary & references) to a lot of distracting clutter (maps, word focus, articles, &c.).

In a strictly aesthetic sense, the old Scofield Study Bible did a good job of this.

picture$32
 
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