Reformed Reading Recommendations for Youth

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2ndViolinist

Puritan Board Freshman
Hello everyone,

Here is my situation: My parents are Roman Catholic. Even though I am an adult, I still live at home. When my parents attend mass, I attend a Reformed church. I have a younger sister who goes with them, but I have been trying to witness to her for a while and really, see to it that she always has exposure to the Bible and the things of God in the hopes that she would be saved. I pray for her--and my family--almost every day.

Together, my sister and I have read through parts of Genesis, parts of the gospels, some of the Psalms, the book of James, and other passages in the Bible. Last summer, we went through the Children's Catechism, but I plan to keep on reviewing it with her. Recently I let her read One Heartbeat Away by Mark Cahill. I read it ten years ago, before I became Reformed. It is a good and basic introduction of man's need for a Savior, but the author is certainly not Reformed.

Does anyone have recommended Reformed reading for young ones? I'm looking for reading materials on doctrines, theology, the Christian Walk, etc. My sister is in elementary school, 10 years old. What I enjoy (J.C. Ryle, C.H. Spurgeon, R.C. Sproul, John Stott, Elisabeth Elliott) may be a bit overwhelming for her right now...

Any input would be very much appreciated. :book2:
 

Afterthought

Puritan Board Senior
I really don't know whether these are good suggestions, so just throwing some stuff out there to help the thread get going. I remember Sinclair Ferguson's Heart for God is fairly simple, although I don't recall how simple. Vic Lochman's illustrated Shorter Catechisms and Reading and Understanding the Bible were recommended to me as simple books when I was asking for simple works in another context. There are also lots of Shorter Catechism commentaries available on the internet. And for what it's worth, I know some people who read Ryle to their children, although the children have been raised Reformed. Might be worth a shot to see if she is able to handle some of Ryle's writings?
 

mossy

Puritan Board Freshman
Kat,
I am using Big Truths For Young Hearts by Bruce Ware with my grandson and he is enjoying it.
Terry
 

Jeri Tanner

Moderator
Staff member
Kat, how great that you have the opportunity and desire to help your sister! I pray it will bear fruit in her life. I would recommend that you memorize the catechism with her, making it an enjoyable time together. Also you could sing through Psalms together. As far as literature, nothing beats simply reading the Bible together- especially, for young children, the historical/narrative sections.
 

DW1689

Puritan Board Freshman
The Bruce Ware book mentioned above has one of the best and easy-to-understand treatments of God's absolute sovereignty and Providence that I'e ever read. It is outstanding and will always be the first place I take anyone regardless of age.

However Ware is only broadly Reformed (like Piper, Grudem etc.). R.C. Sproul's 'Everyone's A Theologian' is a nice and simple intro to Reformed theology. Chapters are short and Sproul is always very clear.

You could read Pilgrim's Progress together too! What a great way to teach her about the Christian life!
 

DW1689

Puritan Board Freshman
Also, I've heard Carl Trueman rave about how good Starr Meade's childrens book on the Heidelberg Catechism is for people of all ages. And, I know everyone goes on about how good Simonetta Carr's Christian biographies for children are. She's done people like Athanasius, Augustine, Calvin, Lady Jane Grey and others. Not too sure if they would be too 'young' for a ten year old but I imagine they would make fantastic introductions to some of the great men and women of Church history :)
 

Rev. Todd Ruddell

Puritan Board Junior
Although not particularly designed for a young lady that has an RCC background, we encourage those in the Church who complete their memory work with books. This is the "Young Ladies' Bookshelf" we give to those who complete their work.

The Young Lady’s Counselor, Daniel Wise
Young Lady’s Guide, Harvey Newcomb
Famous Women of the Reformed Church, James I Good
Female Piety, John Angell James
Women of the Bible, Charles Adams
 

Cymro

Puritan Board Junior
Youngsters love to read a story, and there is a small novel based on a true story that I have just given to my granddaughter. It is called, Her Benny, and is tear jerker even for adults. It concerns a girl not yet 10,and tells of her experience of coming to Christ, and her brother. The street children are Dickensian in poverty and practice,though at a later date. It even covers election in a simple form. A number of adults having read it confessed to shedding tears, my wife included.
 

reaganmarsh

Puritan Board Senior
Spends 2 years reading and meditating upon this book. It is the most important book on my shelf. You will learn more from this book than in a million academic classes.

http://www.amazon.com/Dictionary-La...971&sr=8-1&keywords=richard+muller+dictionary

I posted this on the wrong thread. I meant to post it on the one DW1689 started. I wouldn't recommend this to a youth. LOL!

I was reading your post and thinking, 'Wow...must be some book!" Ha ha!
 

2ndViolinist

Puritan Board Freshman
Thank you, everyone, for your suggestions. I really am grateful. I will check out everything that was mentioned--yes, even the dictionary Jacob suggested, though not for my sister. :eek:

What a blessing!
 

Jack K

Puritan Board Professor
Kat,

Sorry I'm late to the party here, but you might want to check out Marty Machowski's latest book, The Ology, which is a sort of systematic theology for kids and is right about at a ten-year-old's level. It is quite thorough for a children's book and most of the entries are excellent. It even reads a little bit like a storybook, which is helpful with kids. Although I like Bruce Ware's Big Truths for Young Hearts a lot, The Ology better fits your sister's age and is somewhat more Presbyterian-friendly, even though both authors are baptistic.

Marty is not fully Reformed when it comes to a few distinctives like sacraments and worship, but even on those topics he has good things to say and is aware enough of the Reformed positions that he seldom says much a good Presbyterian would disagree with; he just falls short of what we might like him to say. Beyond that, he's solidly Calvinistic, biblically astute, and sensible in his approach throughout. Feel free to ask for further details if you wonder about the handling of specific topics.
 
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