"Reformed" Baptist?

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Kaalvenist

Puritan Board Sophomore
At what point in history -- and if it may be known, by whom -- was the phrase "Reformed" Baptist first used? I understand that most churches that hold to the Second London Confession, prior to the twentieth century, referred to themselves as "Particular" Baptists (referring to their belief in particular redemption). And as has been frequently pointed out, "Reformed" has historically been used to describe churches which hold to a specific ecclesiology as well as soteriology, not embraced by "Reformed" Baptists. When did Baptists and Baptist churches first start to use this phrase?
 

Coram Deo

Puritan Board Junior
I am not sure exact year but here is a quote from one Reformed Baptist website...

"Historically, Baptists have been Calvinistic and Reformed in their theology. The last half of the 19th century saw a great departure among the Baptists from their historical theological roots towards a more man-centered, humanistic belief and practice. This was due to German rationalism and a widespread Arminian theology. Not all departed. A few, such as the great Baptist preacher and theologian C.H. Spurgeon, remained faithful and prayed for the day when the whole counsel of God would again be believed and proclaimed in all churches, especially Baptist churches. During the first and middle parts of the 20th century, the Lord God was pleased to turn the hearts of some godly men back to the biblical and theological foundations of our forefathers. They wrote extensively, challenged church leaders and laymen alike, and prayed. This gave rise to the modern Reformed Baptist movement.

Reformed Baptists have deep roots going all the way back to the Protestant Reformation and, in some instances, have connections predating the Reformation."


At what point in history -- and if it may be known, by whom -- was the phrase "Reformed" Baptist first used? I understand that most churches that hold to the Second London Confession, prior to the twentieth century, referred to themselves as "Particular" Baptists (referring to their belief in particular redemption). And as has been frequently pointed out, "Reformed" has historically been used to describe churches which hold to a specific ecclesiology as well as soteriology, not embraced by "Reformed" Baptists. When did Baptists and Baptist churches first start to use this phrase?
 

KMK

Administrator
Staff member
I believe the phrase was coined by John the Baptist about 2000 years ago.
 

MW

Puritanboard Amanuensis
An educated guess, but nothing concrete to back it up -- I would imagine the term itself grew out of the Banner of Truth movement which had a Calvinistic effect amongst people who remained Baptist in the 60s and 70s.
 

Contra_Mundum

Pilgrim, Alien, Stranger
Staff member
If no one here can provide you with a clear, unambiguious answer, I would contact someone like Dr. Renihan (at West. Sem. Calif.) and ask him for an insight. I suspect he would be as good a person as any to tell you how such a term came to be prevelant. I would suspect that the terminology came into common use in the early to mid 20th century.
 

VictorBravo

Administrator
Staff member
I believe the phrase was coined by John the Baptist about 2000 years ago.

Nah, it was Naaman.

I don't know exactly when the term came into use, but I'd guess it was in the 20th century in an effort to distinguish themselves from the other ones who went astray. "Particular" wouldn't work because some understand that to mean holding to the earlier London Confession. I suppose that "Puritan" may have been a possibility, but given our age, nobody would want to go to a "Puritan Baptist church."
 

VictorBravo

Administrator
Staff member
If no one here can provide you with a clear, unambiguious answer, I would contact someone like Dr. Renihan (at West. Sem. Calif.) and ask him for an insight. I suspect he would be as good a person as any to tell you how such a term came to be prevelant. I would suspect that the terminology came into common use in the early to mid 20th century.

LOL, I should have just waited. That's the best approach yet. Dr. Renihan is very approachable.
 

Raj

Puritan Board Sophomore
Reformed Baptist put together

I asked a similar question (Reformed+Baptist) to one of my friend here, a few days ago.

I heard/ read more about 'Reformed' and then about 'Baptist' but what does it mean to be Reformed Baptist? What are the basic similarties and differences I wanted to hear.
 

Herald

Administrator
Staff member
My church does not have the title word "Reformed" in our name (Grace Baptist Church). But if you compare those Baptist churches that teach the doctrines of grace and also disavow dispensationalism, one can rightly say they are "reformed" Baptist churches, the proof of their reformation being a return to right doctrine.
 

KMK

Administrator
Staff member
My church does not have the title word "Reformed" in our name (Grace Baptist Church). But if you compare those Baptist churches that teach the doctrines of grace and also disavow dispensationalism, one can rightly say they are "reformed" Baptist churches, the proof of their reformation being a return to right doctrine.

From Websters 1828:

Reformed, pp. Corrected; amended; restored to a good state...

In this sense Bill is absolutely correct. Why not call all churches that are restored to a good state, 'reformed'.

Maybe someday there will be a Reformed Methodist Church!
 
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