Real Easter Sunrise Services

Discussion in 'General discussions' started by bookslover, Apr 17, 2017.

  1. bookslover

    bookslover Puritan Board Post-Graduate

    So, were there any Easter sunrise services that were actually, literally at sunrise? This seems to be a dying breed. There used to be a big one here in the Los Angeles area, but I think it died out some time ago.

    Sunrise? Too cold, too dark...

    Just wondering if it still exists anywhere.
     
  2. Beezer

    Beezer Puritan Board Freshman

    There were no sunrise services in my area that I'm aware of...sadly there were several churches that had Easter egg hunts. One church in particular even had someone dressed up like a giant Easter bunny and allowed families to line up and take selfies with it. Yep. Not making it up.
     
  3. Jack K

    Jack K Puritan Board Post-Graduate

    My church did one.
     
  4. Joshua

    Joshua - Staff Member

    I hope not.
     
  5. NaphtaliPress

    NaphtaliPress Administrator Staff Member

    This whole cyclical liturgical view of worship is wrong. Fesko writes albeit too briefly on this, observing,

    The Church Calendar conflicts with the biblical view of worship and what the Reformed tradition calls the regulative principle. There is the constant theme in Scripture that God sets the standards for worship, not man (Deut. 12.32; Matt. 15.9; Lev. 10.1-2; 1 Cor. 14.1ff). For this reason the Westminster divines write that “the acceptable way of worshipping the true God is instituted by Himself, and so limited by His own revealed will” (WCF 21.1b). God has not instituted the Church Calendar. Paul exhorts Timothy to “preach the Word” (2 Tim. 4.2); he does not give him a schedule to follow. Moreover, the previously cited author claims that the Church Calendar would bring about unity that nothing else can bring about. If this was the case, why did God in all of His wisdom not command the Church to do this? Moreover, the argument that the entire Church body needs to follow the same schedule flies in the face of the occasional nature of the New Testament epistles. A Church Calendar will not bring about greater unity, only Christ can bring unity through the work of the Holy Spirit and the means of grace. If this is how the Church Calendar conflicts with the biblical view of worship, how does it conflict with the Bible’s view of history?​

    Note the language that is used to describe the Church Calendar: “In the liturgical year the various aspects of the one Paschal mystery unfold. This is also the case with the cycle of feasts surrounding the mystery of the incarnation” (Catechism of the Catholic Church, p. 303, § 1171; emphasis). Notice that the church calendar operates on a cyclical pattern. It is ancient pagan religions that have a cyclical view of history: “The world-cycle runs its course, obeys it stars, absolves its round, and then the end links on to a new beginning, ushering in a repetition of the same sequence” (Geerhardus Vos, Pauline Eschatology, p. 334). A cyclical view of history is at odds with the biblical view, which is linear—a definite beginning and end, not an endless repetitive cycle. The Church should not expect “a quasi-consummation, which would bear on its face the Sisyphus-expression of endless toil” (Vos, Pauline Eschatology, p. 334). In other words, the Church Calendar repeats the same endless cycle, Advent, Christmas, Epiphany, Lent, Easter, Ascension, Pentecost, only to start over again with Advent. The biblical view, on the other hand, recognizes that the events of Christ’s ministry are in the past and that we are moving forward to a goal—the consummation of history, the return of Christ, the final judgment, and eternity with our triune Lord.​

    God reminds us of this linear understanding of history, a beginning and an end, by the Sabbath. For example, the author of Hebrews writes: “There remains therefore a rest for the people of God” (Heb. 4.9). He reminds his recipients that just as God concluded His creative work and entered His Sabbath rest (Gen. 2.2; cf. Heb. 4.1-11), so too we must desire to enter God’s Sabbath rest. We get a foretaste of that final eschatological rest each and every Sunday. For this reason, OPC Minister and professor at Westminster Seminary, Richard Gaffin, notes that “the pattern of six days of activity interrupted by one of rest is a reminder that human beings are not caught up in a meaningless flow of days, one after the other without end, but that history has a beginning and ending and is headed toward final judgment and the consummation of all things” (“The Sabbath: A Sign of Hope,” OPC Position Paper, p. 6). In a sense, God has given the Church a calendar—observe a Sabbath rest and worship Him on this day (Exo. 20.8-11; cf. Acts 20.7; 1 Cor. 16.2). On the Sabbath we recall the great redemptive events of the past, namely Christ’s first advent, ministry, death, resurrection, and ascension, and look forward to the consummation of the age and His second advent.​

     
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  6. Edward

    Edward Puritan Board Doctor

    Your post did get me wondering about that. Looked on the internet, and a couple of local Methodist megachurches had services starting at 6:30 am. The local Baptist megachurch didn't.

    Down in 'the bubble' in Dallas, Highland Park Presbyterian (ECO) and Highland Park Methodist had a 6:30 services. Park Cities Baptist started at 6:45. In the Black area, Wheatland UMC had a 6:30 service.

    There are likely others, but that's what I turned up in a quick search. Those listed should cover around 50,000 members.
     
  7. arapahoepark

    arapahoepark Puritan Board Senior

    The famous Red Rocks had one...
     

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