Presumptuous sins and making provision for the flesh

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Von

Puritan Board Sophomore
In Romans 13:14 it reads "make no provision for the flesh, to gratify its desires".
1) Is making provision for the flesh the same as presumptuous sins (of Ps 19:13), and
2) Is it possible for a believer to commit presumptuous sins?
 

Contra_Mundum

Pilgrim, Alien, Stranger
Staff member
1. I don't think the two terms are somehow defining of the other. It's possible sinning in a presumptuous way could result from making provision for the flesh.

The Hebrew terms מִזֵּדִ֨ים and זָדוֹן and זִיד are terms describing arrogance and insolence. All sin in some way partakes of pride, of setting down God's will and elevating our own. The ultimate presumption is defiance of God in the face of conviction, a refusal to repent, to own one's sin and the just sentence of God.

2. Ps.19:13, "Keep back thy servant also from presumptuous sins; let them not have dominion over me: then shall I be upright, and I shall be innocent from the great transgression."

This believer (David) seems to know he could do such a thing. In fact, we know he DID such things. His greatest sins were of the nature of those high-handed behaviors of the most openly rebellious persons. And so declared the prophet who confronted him. What saved David, after the grace of God first of all, was that he did not persist in his presumptuous sin but repented.
 

JimmyH

Puritan Board Senior
While this doesn't address the OP's question, so well answered by Reverend Buchanan, it might contribute something to the conversation. For example I associate avoiding making provision for the flesh with Job 31:1 (NIV) I made a covenant with my eyes not to look lustfully at a young woman.
If I see what I consider an attractive female strolling down the street, in a grocery store or wherever, I avert my eyes. If I have a problem with some temptation I avoid any triggers that could make it more difficult to 'walk in the Spirit.'
1 Peter 5:8 Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour:
 

Von

Puritan Board Sophomore
Thank you all for your feedback! Rev Buchanan - those were my thoughts exactly (minus the hebrew, of course...). It was at our bible study that this question popped up. Rev McMahon, I digitally browsed through that book - definitely on the to-read-list.
 
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