Politics and Preaching

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CDM

Puritan Board Junior
What do you believe about preaching on political matters? It seems today, that most evangelicals think there should be almost no mention at all of politics (by a minister in or out of the pulpit) - especially naming a particular politician. Why is this?

Consider this obligatory quote ;) by a respected preacher from the past - Spurgeon:

I long for the day when the precepts of the Christian religion shall be the rule among all classes of men, in all transactions. I often hear it said, ‘Do not bring religion into politics.’ This is precisely where it ought to be brought, and set there in the face of all men as on a candlestick. ~The Metropolitan Tabernacle Pulpit, vol. 27 (London: Passmore and Alabaster, 1882), 225.

What about the "Black Brigades" (so-called by the English) of the Revolutionary era? Should they have kept silent? If so, why? And, how do we understand the Prophets of old? Was there a single one who did not "bring religion into politics"?
 
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ChristianHedonist

Puritan Board Freshman
I'm not a minister, but here are my :2cents: :
I absolutely agree with Spurgeon that we should bring religion into politics. However, I don't think we should bring politics into religion, such that ministers are preaching about politics. Ministers need to be preaching only Christ and him crucified according to the Scriptures. They can apply the Scriptures to current events, but I believe it is dangerous to focus too much on politics in religion-specifically in preaching and worship.
 

Ivan

Pastor
I'm not a minister, but here are my :2cents: :
I absolutely agree with Spurgeon that we should bring religion into politics. However, I don't think we should bring politics into religion, such that ministers are preaching about politics. Ministers need to be preaching only Christ and him crucified according to the Scriptures. They can apply the Scriptures to current events, but I believe it is dangerous to focus too much on politics in religion-specifically in preaching and worship.

Dan, that's what I believe and practice.
 

KMK

Administrator
Staff member
I'm not a minister, but here are my :2cents: :
I absolutely agree with Spurgeon that we should bring religion into politics. However, I don't think we should bring politics into religion, such that ministers are preaching about politics. Ministers need to be preaching only Christ and him crucified according to the Scriptures. They can apply the Scriptures to current events, but I believe it is dangerous to focus too much on politics in religion-specifically in preaching and worship.

Dan, that's what I believe and practice.

:ditto:

I am not against it, per se, but have a hard time justifying a sermon in which the Gospel is not presented in some form or fashion.

The more US citizens are changed by the Gospel, the more our politics will change.
 

LawrenceU

Puritan Board Doctor
Politics are the outworkings of religion, pure and simple. I believe that pastors should address political issues, as they relate to Scripture. However, politics should not drive preaching.

BTW, it was the 'Black Regiment' not 'Black Brigade'.
 

MOSES

Puritan Board Freshman
The gospel itself is political in nature.

As Paul says, up against that which was being said about Ceaser:
-Jesus is both Lord and Christ
-Jesus is the savior of all men
-To Jesus every knee shall bow
-Jesus has disarmed the principalites and powers
-Jesus leads us in triumphant procession

Much of what was said of Jesus was put up and against that which was being said of Caesar at that time.
in my opinion, only a relegious AND political movement could turn the world upside down...and that is what was said of the ministry of Paul and the Christians, they were turning the world upside down.
 

fredtgreco

Vanilla Westminsterian
Staff member
Political comments will come up in sermons. But the preacher is called to preach the Scriptures, not political concepts or the news of the day. Far too often political sermons have a topic searching for a text to justify them.
 

KenPierce

Puritan Board Freshman
This is a real tension for me. the WCF tells us that Scripture addresses either directly or principially all of life. SO, therefore nothing is out of bounds for the pulpit.

That said, when Scripture addresses principially, and not directly, we need to be careful to maintain that balance in the preaching. We thus ought to give principles upon which decisions and convictions about politics are based, and not dictate the decisions themselves.

A fine line, and I am sure I have crossed it. But, I did preach on the evils of a system built upon debt, greed, dependency, and envy (ala Herb Schlossberg) before the election!
 

CDM

Puritan Board Junior
This is a real tension for me. the WCF tells us that Scripture addresses either directly or principially all of life. SO, therefore nothing is out of bounds for the pulpit.

That said, when Scripture addresses principially, and not directly, we need to be careful to maintain that balance in the preaching. We thus ought to give principles upon which decisions and convictions about politics are based, and not dictate the decisions themselves.

A fine line, and I am sure I have crossed it. But, I did preach on the evils of a system built upon debt, greed, dependency, and envy (ala Herb Schlossberg) before the election!

Well done!
 
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