Overpaid by employer

Status
Not open for further replies.

Von

Puritan Board Sophomore
A good friend of mine helped out a fellow colleague recently for a few days. They agreed in passing on the compensation, but nothing was set in a contract. Now the friend was paid and it is almost 7-10 times the amount what was (sort of) agreed upon. How do you approach this in a diplomatic/christian manner?
The colleagues in question are not friends.
I hope the question is clear.
 

Ed Walsh

Puritan Board Junior
Seems simple to me:
  1. Assume the employer made a mistake.
  2. Tell the employer he seems to have made a big mistake.
  3. Let the employer decide what to do.
  4. It could be that the employer did it on purpose.
  5. If so, thank the employer and keep the money.
  6. If not, graciously return the overpayment.
What other possible scenario is there?
 

Von

Puritan Board Sophomore
Seems simple to me:
  1. Assume the employer made a mistake.
  2. Tell the employer he seems to have made a big mistake.
  3. Let the employer decide what to do.
  4. It could be that the employer did it on purpose.
  5. If so, thank the employer and keep the money.
  6. If not, graciously return the overpayment.
What other possible scenario is there?
Sounds about right to me.
 

EcclesiaDiscens.

Puritan Board Freshman
Q. 142. What are the sins forbidden in the eighth commandment?
A. The sins forbidden in the eighth commandment, besides the neglect of the duties required, are, theft, robbery, man-stealing, and receiving anything that is stolen; fraudulent dealing, false weights and measures, removing landmarks, injustice and unfaithfulness in contracts between man and man, or in matters of trust; oppression, extortion, usury, bribery, vexatious lawsuits, unjust enclosures and depredation; engrossing commodities to enhance the price; unlawful callings, and all other unjust or sinful ways of taking or withholding from our neighbor what belongs to him, or of enriching ourselves;
 

koenig

Puritan Board Freshman
Seems like this is more faithful and more likely to protect your reputation as well. Which situation is more likely to get you more business--the client has to ask for the money back on their own, or the one who sees you taking the initiative to be honest?
 

ZackF

Puritan Board Graduate
He’s welcome deposit some in my account as well if his conscience compels him.
 

Von

Puritan Board Sophomore
He contacted the employer yesterday. He submitted that he thought he was overpaid. The employer told him that he helped him out in a tight spot and that was the reason for the overpayment.
Thank you for your input!


He’s welcome deposit some in my account as well if his conscience compels him
He's my friend - I get first pick!
 

Ed Walsh

Puritan Board Junior
He contacted the employer yesterday. He submitted that he thought he was overpaid. The employer told him that he helped him out in a tight spot and that was the reason for the overpayment.

A happy ending. Two people you said were not friends may have become so from now on. Mutual trust has been established, which is about 90% of what friendship is all about.

Ed
 

David Taylor

Puritan Board Freshman
Seems simple to me:
  1. Assume the employer made a mistake.
  2. Tell the employer he seems to have made a big mistake.
  3. Let the employer decide what to do.
  4. It could be that the employer did it on purpose.
  5. If so, thank the employer and keep the money.
  6. If not, graciously return the overpayment.
What other possible scenario is there?
I agree with this. Back in 2015 I was forced to leave a job because of some things going on in our family. I received a paycheck Christmas Bonus in the mail about a month later. I called the company and spoke with the President and let him know of the error. He told me that he personally told them to send it to me because he thought I could use it for our family.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top