Odd Type of Preterism

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Ranger

Puritan Board Freshman
I'm taking a one week class on the Revelation, and was surprised when my professor wasn't a typical Dispensational even though I had been told he wasn't.

I've never heard of his interpretation though. Ala Osborne, he takes an eclectic approach somewhere between idealist and preterist, but his form of preterism is what's odd. It has nothing to do with Rome. He believes that the passages concerning Babylon, the beast, etc. are all in reference to 1st century Judaism. It was odd. At least he gave a good defense of an early dating of the book.

[Edited on 5-1-2005 by Ranger]
 

Ranger

Puritan Board Freshman
According to him, he could care less about Rome or the Imperial Cult because he says that the Revelation isn't concerned with them at all. The seven hills, 6th king, etc. are all in reference to the Jews.
 

Ivan

Pastor
Originally posted by Ranger
According to him, he could care less about Rome or the Imperial Cult because he says that the Revelation isn't concerned with them at all. The seven hills, 6th king, etc. are all in reference to the Jews.

Who is your professor at Southwestern?
 

Ivan

Pastor
Originally posted by Ranger
Dr. Paul Wolfe. I was excited that it wasn't Drs. Patterson or Blaising.

HA! Funny! Yes, I had professors I wanted to avoid while at Southwestern, but it's been 24 years since I've graduated. Not many professors left from those days.

What is Dr. Wolfe's credentials? Where did he go to school?
 

Ranger

Puritan Board Freshman
DBU for his BA and MA, and Aberdeen for his PhD.

* Ephesians (New American Commentary 31). Broadman & Holman, forthcoming.
* "Hope Enacted: Forgiveness as Ethical Foundation in the New Testament," Southwestern Journal of Theology 45.3 (2003) pp. 18-29.
* Translation consultant for I and II Peter, Holman Christian Standard Bible. Broadman & Holman Publishers.
* Revision team member, A Concordance to the Greek New Testament, 6th ed. Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 2002.
* "The Prophet's Understanding or Understanding the Prophets?: 2 Peter 1:20 Reconsidered," Baptist Review of Theology. 8.1 (1998) pp.92-106.
* Assistant Editor, Criswell Theological Review. 1991-1992, Co-editor, 1992-1995.
* "The Church: Heaven's Stained Glass Window," Texas Baptist II.3 (April, 1995) pp.6-7.
* "Priorities During Change," Moody (March, 1995) p.40.
* "Revival in Our Day? Reviews and Reflections," Criswell Theological Review 5.2 (1991) pp.287-301.
* Assistant and Contributing Editor, The Believer's Study Bible. Thomas Nelson, 1991.
* "Scripture in the Pastoral Epistles - PreMarcion Marcionism?," Perspectives in Religious Studies 16.1 (1989) pp.5-16.
 

openairboy

Puritan Board Freshman
Originally posted by Ranger
I'm taking a one week class on the Revelation, and was surprised when my professor wasn't a typical Dispensational even though I had been told he wasn't.

I've never heard of his interpretation though. Ala Osborne, he takes an eclectic approach somewhere between idealist and preterist, but his form of preterism is what's odd. It has nothing to do with Rome. He believes that the passages concerning Babylon, the beast, etc. are all in reference to 1st century Judaism. It was odd. At least he gave a good defense of an early dating of the book.

[Edited on 5-1-2005 by Ranger]

I haven't listened to all of the tapes, but I believe James Jordan's commentary on Revelation is in a similar vein.

For what it's worth,

openairboy
 
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