NPP, Auburn Avenue and Reformed Catholism...

Discussion in 'Federal Vision/New Perspectives' started by Bryan, Aug 11, 2004.

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  1. Bryan

    Bryan Puritan Board Freshman

    NPP, Auburn Avenue and Reformed Catholism, are these different movements or all they all part of the same one? I've read through Duncan's article on NPP and Phil Johnsons lecture on it and from what I know of the other two it seems like they are all very cloesly linked. Am I wrong here?

    Bryan
    SDG
     
  2. cupotea

    cupotea Puritan Board Junior

    As I understand it, NPP is a, mainly, British production being the work of N.T. Wright, Bishop of Durham and a Professor J. D. G. Dunn. This view purports to have a new, better understanding of Paul that the Refornmers missed and, essentially ends up agreeing with Rome that works are in some sense, if combined with 'true faith' meritorious for justification.

    The Auburn Avenue movement, or "Federal Visionism" as it is sometimes called is s movement specific to American Reformed Churches to reorder the doctrine of election as it relates to the Sacrament of Baptism. The conclusion seems to be that Baptism, in some sense 'activates' election and is not merely 'presumptive'. The FV/AA views seem to end up with a species of baptismal regeneration.

    The Reformed Catholicism movement is, unless I am mistaken, related to the latter and may be perceived as one of it's fruits. It is no mistake that many of the leading lights of the latter were formed under the tutelage of Dr Shepherd and others who have taught 'Federal Visionism'. It (The RC movement) is concerned with returning the American Reformed churches to a more liturgical worship style and to a use of the Calendar... And some other things...others here could speak more completely on this...I know very little about this last one...I tend to be rather impatient with innovation. Even when it is put forward as repristination.

    Inasmuch as all these 'movements' represent a departure from the Reformation and/or the Westminster standards and an effective move toward Rome both doctrinally and practically, I tend to lump them all together. I am of course at least a little aware of the fine distinctions.

    Paul wrote the first Corinthian epistle to a church which was being troubled by innovators. He presented himself as having come among them in smallness, knowing only Christ and Him crucified. The whole letter is a treatise on the nature of the [i:aa4f620d92]theologia crucis [/i:aa4f620d92]and it's superiority to that [i:aa4f620d92]theologia gloriae [/i:aa4f620d92]which sought newer, bigger, 'more apostolic' forms of the Gospel message.

    We would do well to read and study this letter whenever we are presented with new revisions or reimaginings of what have for so long stood the Church in good stead.
     
  3. wsw201

    wsw201 Puritan Board Senior

    Bryan,

    Michael is right on about these various movements. One thing though is that a major proponent of NPP before Dunn and Wright was EP Sanders (An American. I believe he is currently teaching at Duke). Wright though is the most prolific supporter of NPP. What is interesting about all this is that all the folks associated with FV are associated with the Reformed Catholicity movement.
     
  4. Bryan

    Bryan Puritan Board Freshman

    thank you guys that was very helpful. With These 3 different "movements" happeneing who are all trying to appear orthodox it's hard to seperate whats teaching what un-orthodoxy these days!

    Bryan
    SDG
     
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