Credo-Baptism Answers Multiple baptisms?

Discussion in 'Credo-Baptism Answers' started by Nomos, Aug 31, 2019.

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  1. Nomos

    Nomos Puritan Board Freshman

    If a person is baptized within a baptist church, but later comes to the conviction that the profession that led to their original baptism was not legitimate (too young, or just wanted to get the girl), is that person then baptized again once they later have a legitimate confession of faith?
     
  2. Dachaser

    Dachaser Puritan Board Doctor

    Would say yes, for they did not fully comprehend just what was intended and meant by the water baptism. I am assuming here that the person is saying they did not see themselves as being really saved at the time, so was not a legit Baptism.
     
  3. C. M. Sheffield

    C. M. Sheffield Puritan Board Junior

    Given these specific circumstances, I would say yes.
     
  4. B.L. McDonald

    B.L. McDonald Puritan Board Freshman

    In the situation you laid out I believe the overwhelming majority of baptist churches would not consider the "baptism" of someone who intentionally gave a false profession of faith as being valid and would administer the ordinance to the person if it was preceded by true repentance and faith.

    Below are the pertinent paragraphs from Chapter 29 of the 1689 LBCF.

    Para 1. Baptism is an ordinance of the New Testament, ordained by Jesus Christ, to be unto the party baptized, a sign of his fellowship with him, in his death and resurrection; of his being engrafted into him;1 of remission of sins;2 and of giving up into God, through Jesus Christ, to live and walk in newness of life.3
    1 Rom. 6:3–5; Col. 2:12; Gal. 3:27
    2 Mark 1:4; Acts 22:16
    3 Rom. 6:4

    Para 2. Those who do actually profess repentance towards God, faith in, and obedience to, our Lord Jesus Christ, are the only proper subjects of this ordinance.4
    4 Mark 16:16; Acts 8:36–37, 2:41, 8:12, 18:8


    With regards to the second hypothetical "too young", can you elaborate what you mean here? Do you mean one who was baptized as an infant?
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2019
  5. Nomos

    Nomos Puritan Board Freshman

    What I had in mind was someone that "made a decison for Jesus" early in life (perhaps under pressure from others) who then shows no fruit in subsequent years when later upon reflection, the individual concludes that they probably did not have an authentic faith.
     
  6. B.L. McDonald

    B.L. McDonald Puritan Board Freshman

    The "made a decision for Jesus" part made me cringe a bit as most of us loathe that expression due to the misunderstanding often associated with it. Regeneration, which brings a person from spiritual death to life, is exclusively God's work. I know what you intend to be asking though and will move on to the heart of your question.

    I think instances like these aren't so cut and dry and need to be handled with a lot of pastoral care and sensitivity. The seed of true faith that a young child may have will grow into a well watered tree over time; it's part of growing and maturing in Christ. Moreover, sanctification, which is the continuing change that God works in us, is often slower than we'd like. In instances where one doubts whether the repentance and faith that preceded their baptism was genuine these cases need to be handled individually by the elders in the church. If it is in fact determined that the person fabricated his/her profession of faith under pressure, etc. then I think most baptist churches would administer the ordinance of baptism to that person if it were preceded by true repentance and faith. If on the other hand the person is just struggling with assurance and wrestling over their salvation then absolutely not. Baptism is a one-time event; not something done repeatedly.
     
  7. Dachaser

    Dachaser Puritan Board Doctor

    Yes, as there would be a real difference between one not sure was really saved, and who knows now was faking it!
     
  8. Nomos

    Nomos Puritan Board Freshman

    Making a decision for Jesus was an example used in contrast to an authentic experience of regeneration. It is rather common for people to base their position before God upon their 'decision', which is why I chose that as an example (along with the subsequent lack of any evidence of faith). It was not intended to be an example of one that was truly regenerate, which is why it relates to the question about multiple baptisms.

    What about apostates that have been excommunicated? Are they rebaptized if they are restored to communion? Or are there circumstances where the one excommunicated might need to be rebaptized?

    Thank you for your helpful answers.

    Ryan
     
  9. Dachaser

    Dachaser Puritan Board Doctor

    In my Baptist Church, we have done that once, and was due to breaking marriage vows, as person refused to repent of sinful behavior. Not really Apostate, more like someone refusing to obey the scriptures
     
  10. Chad Hutson

    Chad Hutson Puritan Board Freshman

    I would not recommend, nor would I conduct, a baptism for one who was received back into fellowship following a prior excommunication. I would, however, recommend baptism for your previous examples. A true conversion should require baptism.
    At the church I pastor, we "re-baptized" some after I first came there due to the fact that the previous pastor of twenty years was simply baptizing people who wanted to join the church as if they were joining a civic club. After sitting under the gospel, they came under conviction of sin and were converted. We have not done so since as it was a unique situation.
     
  11. Nomos

    Nomos Puritan Board Freshman

    This was along the line of examples I had in mind. Thanks for sharing your answer. I can't quite undersrand why there wouldn't be scenarios where an apoatate would need to be rebaptized though. Wouldn't their removal from communion publically communicate they are not of the faith?

    Blessings.
     
  12. Nomos

    Nomos Puritan Board Freshman

    I'm not sure I follow your example here. Is the 'that' in your first sentence referring to rebaptism?
     
  13. Chad Hutson

    Chad Hutson Puritan Board Freshman

    Excommunication is for the purpose of shaming one into repentance while simultaneously maintaining the sanctity of the church (difficult these days). If an "apostate" returns to the church and complies with the judgment of the leadership, and shows fruit worthy of repentance, then apparently they were/are believers who strayed, grieving the Spirit, and bringing hurt and scandal upon themselves and others. Their repentance is renewed and they are preserved through faith in Christ (1689 LBC 17:3). In other words, their return is evidence of the validity of their original profession of faith.
     
  14. Ben Zartman

    Ben Zartman Puritan Board Sophomore

    I would recommend against re-baptizing unless the subject knew when being baptized that he was not saved, and by being baptized was sinning with a high hand for an ulterior motive. Someone who "made a decision," may have been sincere, may have thought he was saved--may have been saved and not had assurance till later! Second-guessing old actions and basing the validity of baptism on assurance that waxes and wanes with one's spiritual state is a recipe for turning it into a bizarre lifetime of re-baptizements. "Oh, I wasn't saved, but am now. Let's baptize--oh wait: that last time didn't count because I fell into sin after, but this next one will..." well, where does it stop?
     
  15. Nomos

    Nomos Puritan Board Freshman

    But similarly, their return could also indicate they are now of the faith and were not before, no?
     
  16. Dachaser

    Dachaser Puritan Board Doctor

    No, saying that Apostate and believer refusing to repent are not same things!
     
  17. Dachaser

    Dachaser Puritan Board Doctor

    Which would mean that the original water baptism was legit.
     
  18. Dachaser

    Dachaser Puritan Board Doctor

    No, rather that theri coming back proved that they were really saved, as Apostates will never come back, as were never saved!
     
  19. Nomos

    Nomos Puritan Board Freshman

    What would an apostate come back to if they were never part of the church? Come back to what?
     
  20. Nomos

    Nomos Puritan Board Freshman

    What is the difference between an apostate and a non-believer in the baptist view?
     
  21. Chad Hutson

    Chad Hutson Puritan Board Freshman

    Apostasy, in the context of the question posed, is a willful turning away from the faith, abandonment. Apostasy in its truest sense means there is no return, hence no true salvation to begin with. An apostate is one who lived a lie and then leaves. A non-believer is one who has never had a profession of faith. As for a so-called believer who drifts into doctrinal error and apostatizes, the same would apply to them: a renunciation of error and a willingness to repent and be restored proves they are genuine. Remember, every circumstance is different and nuanced, and we can only go by what we know and see. Ultimately, only God knows the true state of a person's heart. That comforts me, for I am prone to mistakes, while God is infallible.
     
  22. Dachaser

    Dachaser Puritan Board Doctor

    Apostate is one who professed salvation, but never was a real Christian.
     
  23. Dachaser

    Dachaser Puritan Board Doctor

    They will never return once turned aside, as they never were of Christ.
     
  24. Chad Hutson

    Chad Hutson Puritan Board Freshman

    I would love to vote in the above poll, however my vote would have to be qualified and that option is not available. Who determines the legitimacy of the profession of faith? There are far too many variables to make a blanket yes/no answer.
    Recently, I was approached by a young man (early twenties) who made a profession of faith in his teens. Since then his walk has been spotty at best, marked by sin followed by what I would define as attempts to reform. Lately he has been more faithful. Nevertheless, he asked if he should be rebaptized as a sign of his new sincerity in following Christ. When asked if his earlier confession was true, he said it was. I then told him that baptism is not a sign of re-commitment, but rather of regeneration/conversion/identification with Christ. I explained that there was no need for baptism, since the original was valid by his own admission. However, if he wanted to make a public statement I would provide the opportunity for him to address the church following a service or a meeting, at which time he could renounce his waywardness and lack of commitment in public repentance if he so desired.
    Haven't heard back from him. Interpret that as you wish.
     
  25. Dachaser

    Dachaser Puritan Board Doctor

    Water Baptism should be redone only when person saying was a false profession and confession of faith in Christ.
     
  26. Chad Hutson

    Chad Hutson Puritan Board Freshman

    Yes, but the question doesn't reflect that. Perhaps I'm misreading it or overthinking it.
     
  27. Kinghezy

    Kinghezy Puritan Board Freshman

    I am having a hard time squaring these two statements. Do you think the church erred when the the person returned to the church? It seems like you indicated the church re-baptized because of the severity of the sin, not that the baptism was somehow invalid.
     
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  28. Dachaser

    Dachaser Puritan Board Doctor

    Paul commands the church to receive back when who has been turned out into the world IF they show true repentance and fruit, and thus no need to rebaptize, as that showed that the original one was legit.
     
  29. Nomos

    Nomos Puritan Board Freshman

    Except if the person tells you their initial profession was fabricated.
     
  30. Dachaser

    Dachaser Puritan Board Doctor

    Yes, if they realise that they were not saved at the time, was not a valid Baptism!
     
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