More praise for Todd's bourbon based pork loin marinade

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SolaScriptura

Puritanboard Brimstone
Ok folks, for those of you who haven't tried it yet: Do so. A few months ago Todd gave a recipe for a bourbon based marinade for a pork loin. A couple folks have tried it and posted their feedback saying that it was exceptional.

Exceptional is an understatement. I about wept. I wanted to drink the juice from the pan. It wasn't just great... it was uber-great.

Here's the recipe:

* 1/4 cup Kentucky Bourbon
* 1/4 cup light soy sauce
* 1/4 cup packed brown sugar
* 2 large cloves garlic, chopped
* 1/4 cup Dijon mustard
* 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger, or 1 teaspoon finely minced fresh ginger
* 2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
* 1/4 cup vegetable oil
* dash hot sauce
* 2 pork tenderloins, about 1 1/2 to 2 pounds



*** For those of you who aren't familiar with bourbon and may wonder which brand to purchase... My favorite bourbon is Woodford Reserve. I highly recommend it for all your bourbon needs. ***

We doubled the recipe, I cut the loin in half and marinated it over night.... I cooked it by searing the meat on a super hot cast iron skillet (I got it hot by putting the skillet on my gas grill) and then I cooked it in the oven at 375 until the interior was 165. Then I let it sit for 10 minutes. Then my family consumed it.

Mind you, the mouth-watering aroma that filled the kitchen while it cooked was sublime.

Well done, Todd! Well done!
 
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AltogetherLovely

Puritan Board Freshman
You also helped out a great deal by cooking it properly, or so it sounds. :)

Searing it first, letting it sit after it's done, and avoiding over-cooking (which is especially tempting because of the consequences of underdone pork)....that's all straight from the textbook.

Unfortunately, the vast majority of cooks haven't read the textbook :lol:

We're going to have to try this.
 

toddpedlar

Iron Dramatist
Thanks for the thanks - let me tell you, I'm going to have to make that again... we just got some locally raised mostly-grass fed pork from a colleague - and it's time. Drinking the juices from the pan is DEFINITELY a hard temptation to avoid! :)

Aren't you glad God said to Peter, "ARISE, kill and eat!"?
 

SolaScriptura

Puritanboard Brimstone
Thanks for the thanks - let me tell you, I'm going to have to make that again... we just got some locally raised mostly-grass fed pork from a colleague - and it's time. Drinking the juices from the pan is DEFINITELY a hard temptation to avoid! :)

Aren't you glad God said to Peter, "ARISE, kill and eat!"?

Aw man, you have NO IDEA how glad I am!!! :lol:
 

Idelette

Puritan Board Graduate
You know I've been looking for a really good marinade....and this one looks excellent! Thanks Todd and Ben!
 

SolaScriptura

Puritanboard Brimstone
You also helped out a great deal by cooking it properly, or so it sounds. :)

I've learned a lot from watching Good Eats over the years. ;)


I think the single greatest investment I've made - or anyone can make - for their kitchen in order to ensure meat awesomeness is a good meat thermometer. Seriously. With a good thermometer (we have one of those probe thermometers that you leave in the meat and the cord runs out of the oven and you can watch the digital reader show you the exact degree of the meat)... with a good thermometer you can pull it out of the oven the exact moment the meat reaches the perfect degree (pun intended!) of doneness. Since getting that tool all of our meat has been succulent. Every kitchen should have one.
 

AThornquist

Puritan Board Doctor
I think the single greatest investment I've made - or anyone can make - for their kitchen in order to ensure meat awesomeness is a good meat thermometer. Seriously. With a good thermometer (we have one of those probe thermometers that you leave in the meat and the cord runs out of the oven and you can watch the digital reader show you the exact degree of the meat)... with a good thermometer you can pull it out of the oven the exact moment the meat reaches the perfect degree (pun intended!) of doneness. Since getting that tool all of our meat has been succulent. Every kitchen should have one.


Yep, this is definitely Alton Brown talk ;)

I really want to try this recipe :drool:
 

matthew11v25

Puritan Board Sophomore
I love alton brown...my wife is italian and a die hard giada fan (she has met and taken a class in person).

I prefer my pork cooked until the temp is barely safe then let it sit for ten minutes...dry overcooked meat is the worst :)
 
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