Michael Horton Resources

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StephenG

Puritan Board Freshman
I've been enjoying listening to Michael Horton lately.
I really liked his messages at 2010 the West Coast Ligonier Conference (where he talked of "moralistic therapeutic deism"). My question is whether anybody can recommend some other good resources from Mr. Horton specifically on today's Evangelicalism. I think I have a copy of Christless Christianity somewhere.
 

Romans922

Puritan Board Professor
I'd just stay away from him since he is weak on covenant theology, 3rd use of the law, etc. There's better guys to learn from.
 

Beezer

Puritan Board Freshman
I used to subscribe to the White Horse Inn and enjoyed listening to the discussions on my drive to/from work.

I didn't particularly care for the periodical "Modern Reformation", but your mileage may vary.
 

StephenG

Puritan Board Freshman
Perhaps I won't go to him to learn about Covenant theology or the Mosaic Law, but I find him to be solid in other areas. Maybe it would be helpful to note that as a TFU subscriber he doesn't deny the 3rd use of the Law? (Heidelberg Catechism 115, for instance?)
 

Romans922

Puritan Board Professor
Well Stephen, deny and "is weak" are two different things. The 3rd use of the law issues he has will come from his weakness on covenant theology. :book2:
 

StephenG

Puritan Board Freshman
Yes I take issues with some directions of his theology, but I don't think that should scare someone away from reading any of what he said, much of which is very good

Exactly. We'll all find teachers we disagree with, but we don't necessarily throw them out all together. For example, as a Presbyterian, I could probably find much more to disagree with propounded by John MacArthur, but he is still one of my favorite Bible teachers. With Horton, there is probably much more on which we agree.
 

Jack K

Puritan Board Professor
Dr. Horton often teaches classes at his church. Some years ago, I enjoyed listening to much of his class on the Heidelberg Catechism. I don't know if the material at the link will address today's evangelicalism, but you can probably find some pretty good teaching.
 

Andres

Puritan Board Doctor
Dr Horton was long a favorite of mine, but as Andrew has noted, he does have his issues. I'd also advise caution regarding Dr. Horton's two kingdoms views.
 

zsmcd

Puritan Board Freshman
I have read his book entitled "Better Way" which addresses concerns with regards to modern evangelical 'worship'. I found it to be very helpful and encouraging. I agree with others, especially in regards to his two kingdom approach, but that shouldn't keep you from his good stuff.
 

StephenG

Puritan Board Freshman
Thank you all for the recommendations, I will check them out. Thank you also for the warnings, I will do my best to be discerning.
 

Reformed Covenanter

Puritanboard Commissioner
I'd just stay away from him since he is weak on covenant theology, 3rd use of the law, etc. There's better guys to learn from.

I think this advice is short-sighted, to put it mildly. Michael Horton is one of the most well-read, articulate theologians in the contemporary Reformed world. Yes, he has issues on certain subjects, but even so he has also helped to correct a lot of errors in the other direction (the Federal Vision, moralism, and so on). By all means, tell people to be wary of him on certain issues; but to advise people just to avoid him altogether is extremist. The good stuff far outweighs the bad.
 

Pilgrim

Puritanboard Commissioner
A good many of his books have to do with "today's evangelicalism" to some extent or another. I'd recommend simply looking at Amazon and checking out the description of each along with the reviews, which will give you an idea of what they are about.

A lot of his early work dealt with issues in evangelicalism, and some of his later ones have continued that, although perhaps with somewhat less of a focus on things like televangelists. (If memory serves, very early on in his career, he was a member of the Reformed Episcopal Church (switching to URC at a later date, maybe around the time he went to WSCAL) and was a close associate of James Montgomery Boice, hence his involvement in the Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals in its early days.) Although it is a collection of essays and not a book of his per se, Dr. Horton was an editor of "Power Religion," which was a notable work at the time that examined troubling trends in evangelicalism.
 
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