May 21 2004

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Bladestunner316

Puritan Board Doctor
This devotional is from Charles Spurgeon's Faith's Checkbook.


May 21

Rain Without Clouds? Never!
"If the clouds be full of rain, they empty themselves upon the earth"
(Ecclesiastes 11:3).

Why, then, do we dread the clouds which now darken our sky? True, for a while they hide the sun, but the sun is not quenched; He will shine out again before long. Meanwhile those black clouds are filled with rain; and the blacker they are, the more likely they are to yield plentiful showers. How can we have rain without clouds?

Our troubles have always brought us blessings, and they always will. They are the black chariots of bright grace. These clouds will empty themselves before long, and every tender herb will be the gladder for the shower. Our God may drench us with grief, but He will not drown us with wrath; nay, He will refresh us with mercy. Our LORD's love letters often come to us in black-edged envelopes. His wagons rumble, but they are loaded with benefits. His rod blossoms with sweet flowers and nourishing fruits. Let us not worry about the clouds but sing because May flowers are brought to us through the April clouds and showers.

O LORD, the clouds are the dust of Thy feet! How near Thou art in the cloudy and dark day! Love beholds Thee and is glad. Faith sees the clouds emptying themselves and making the little hills rejoice on every side.
 

Puritan Sailor

Puritan Board Doctor
Reminds me of a hymn by William Cowper (from Village Hymns for Social Worship by Asahel Nettleton):
The Mysteries of Providence

1 God moves in a mysterious way,
His wonders to perform;
He plants His footsteps in the sea,
And rides upon the storm

2 Deep in unfathomable mines
Of never failing skill,
He treasures up his bright designs,
And works His soveriegn will.

3 Ye fearful saints, fresh courage take,
The clouds ye so much dread,
Are big with mercy, and shall break
In blessings on your head.

4 Judge not the Lord by feeble sense,
But trust Him for His grace;
Behind a frowning providence
He hides a smiling face.

5 His purposes will ripen fast,
Unfolding every hour;
The bud may have a bitter taste,
But sweet will be the flower.

6 Blind unbelief is sure to err,
And scan his work in vain;
God is His own interpreter,
And He shall make it plain.


Perhaps Spurgeon had this hymn in mind when he wrote the above quote. My favorite verse is verse 4.

[Edited on 5-21-2004 by puritansailor]
 
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