Masters in ??

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Skyler

Puritan Board Graduate
I asked my advisor what master's degree I should go for if I wanted to teach at the community college. He said "Basket weaving."

He explained that so far as he knew, any master's degree would work as long as it was from an accredited university.

So my question: Are there any master's degree programs in theology that are completely online? And secondly, are there any that will take a B.S. instead of a B.A.? Preferably Reformed, of course.

Thanks!
 

PMBrooks

Puritan Board Freshman
It's not exactly that simple. To teach at an accredited institution, you need to have a masters degree with 18 hours in the discipline in which you want to teach. Not just any masters degree will do, especially in "basket weaving.":)

If you want to teach in something that is relative to theology, I would suggest finding a masters program in world religions or philosophy. You would find those areas more cognate to the topics that are normally covered in theology. It would be hard to justify teaching at a community college with a masters in theology, though I know a few who have.

Are there any other disciplines in which you would like to teach?
 

Skyler

Puritan Board Graduate
It's not exactly that simple. To teach at an accredited institution, you need to have a masters degree with 18 hours in the discipline in which you want to teach. Not just any masters degree will do, especially in "basket weaving.":)

I already have an associate's degree in electrical engineering technology(which is what I'd probably be teaching), so I don't think that's a problem.

If you want to teach in something that is relative to theology, I would suggest finding a masters program in world religions or philosophy. You would find those areas more cognate to the topics that are normally covered in theology. It would be hard to justify teaching at a community college with a masters in theology, though I know a few who have.

Are there any other disciplines in which you would like to teach?

At this point the Elec. Eng. Tech faculty are encouraging me to teach in their program, and ever since the Information Technology head heard I was interested in teaching, she's practically begging me to come back. :)

I have, as I said, an associate's degree in electrical engineering technology and I'm finishing up a bachelor's degree in computer science. The website seems to be down for maintenance at the moment, but I'm pretty sure the other faculty have an associate's in electrical engineering and a master's in something else.
 

Prufrock

Arbitrary Moderation
This may be a naive question, but...if you want to teach something related to electrical engineering or engineering technology, why wouldn't you study that?
 

Skyler

Puritan Board Graduate
This may be a naive question, but...if you want to teach something related to electrical engineering or engineering technology, why wouldn't you study that?

That's a good question. :)

Probably the biggest reason is that I've always wanted to study theology. I've thought about taking the TNARS course, but if I could get a master's in theology/religion/something from an accredited seminary, I could kill two birds with one stone.
 

SemperEruditio

Puritan Board Junior
There are no accredited Masters in theology which are completely online. The only one I know of which comes close is RTS' Masters of Arts in Religious Studies. You are still required to go on campus for at least 4 classes which are given as "intensives." So there you go! BTW seminaries are easy to get into. :p
 

CIT

Puritan Board Post-Graduate
There are no accredited Masters in theology which are completely online. The only one I know of which comes close is RTS' Masters of Arts in Religious Studies. You are still required to go on campus for at least 4 classes which are given as "intensives." So there you go! BTW seminaries are easy to get into. :p

Liberty University is completely online and accredited.
 

Skyler

Puritan Board Graduate
There are no accredited Masters in theology which are completely online. The only one I know of which comes close is RTS' Masters of Arts in Religious Studies. You are still required to go on campus for at least 4 classes which are given as "intensives." So there you go! BTW seminaries are easy to get into. :p

Liberty University is completely online and accredited.

I know at least two people who would kill me, slowly, if I attended Liberty University.
 

Damon Rambo

Puritan Board Sophomore
There are no accredited Masters in theology which are completely online. The only one I know of which comes close is RTS' Masters of Arts in Religious Studies. You are still required to go on campus for at least 4 classes which are given as "intensives." So there you go! BTW seminaries are easy to get into. :p

Liberty University is completely online and accredited.

I know at least two people who would kill me, slowly, if I attended Liberty University.

It's not as anti-reformed as everyone makes it out to be. I am attending Liberty's Seminary, and have had little trouble. In fact, my Old Testament professor is Dr. Micheal Grisanti: Professor of Old Testament at the Master's Seminary (J. Macs Seminary). Apparently, TMS, as well as at least three of the "Big Six" do some "professor swapping" with Liberty.

Also, I would like to point out, that at least three of my professors so far, were Calvinists. In fact, if you have ever watched the video "Amazing Grace," one of the professors interviewed on it, that is condemning Arminianism so strongly, is also a professor at Liberty.

Just wanted to clear that up. People hear Ergun Caner, and think that he is representative of the Seminary: he is not.
 

Skyler

Puritan Board Graduate
Liberty University is completely online and accredited.

I know at least two people who would kill me, slowly, if I attended Liberty University.

It's not as anti-reformed as everyone makes it out to be. I am attending Liberty's Seminary, and have had little trouble. In fact, my Old Testament professor is Dr. Micheal Grisanti: Professor of Old Testament at the Master's Seminary (J. Macs Seminary). Apparently, TMS, as well as at least three of the "Big Six" do some "professor swapping" with Liberty.

Also, I would like to point out, that at least three of my professors so far, were Calvinists. In fact, if you have ever watched the video "Amazing Grace," one of the professors interviewed on it, that is condemning Arminianism so strongly, is also a professor at Liberty.

Just wanted to clear that up. People hear Ergun Caner, and think that he is representative of the Seminary: he is not.

Thanks for the defense, Damon. :)

I think, for the most part, everyone just enjoys making fun of LU. I do know someone who's strongly anti-Calvinistic that is a LU graduate, but she may not be a representative sample. :)
 

matt01

Puritan Board Senior
This may be a naive question, but...if you want to teach something related to electrical engineering or engineering technology, why wouldn't you study that?

That's a good question. :)

Probably the biggest reason is that I've always wanted to study theology. I've thought about taking the TNARS course, but if I could get a master's in theology/religion/something from an accredited seminary, I could kill two birds with one stone.

While you might be able to teach electrical engineering at that particular community college with a degree in theology, I would advise against pursuing that degree. You should study something related to the genre that you want to teach. If you are completely unable to do a MS in EE or computer science, you might consider a graduate program in Business. The theology degree would pigeon hole you too much.
 

VictorBravo

Administrator
Staff member
This may be a naive question, but...if you want to teach something related to electrical engineering or engineering technology, why wouldn't you study that?

That's a good question. :)

Probably the biggest reason is that I've always wanted to study theology. I've thought about taking the TNARS course, but if I could get a master's in theology/religion/something from an accredited seminary, I could kill two birds with one stone.

While you might be able to teach electrical engineering at that particular community college with a degree in theology, I would advise against pursuing that degree. You should study something related to the genre that you want to teach. If you are completely unable to do a MS in EE or computer science, you might consider a graduate program in Business. The theology degree would pigeon hole you too much.

I agree. You are completing a BS in engineering and you want to teach in engineering? Get a Masters in Engineering. If this is your intended career, focus on it until you are considered competent in it by your targeted employers (which generally means at least a master's degree for engineering professors).

In 5 years, you may wish to teach at the university level and regret not having the credentials.

Study theology on the side or later, unless theology is really your desired career. If that's the case, then its time to retool and refocus.
 

Skyler

Puritan Board Graduate
This may be a naive question, but...if you want to teach something related to electrical engineering or engineering technology, why wouldn't you study that?

That's a good question. :)

Probably the biggest reason is that I've always wanted to study theology. I've thought about taking the TNARS course, but if I could get a master's in theology/religion/something from an accredited seminary, I could kill two birds with one stone.

While you might be able to teach electrical engineering at that particular community college with a degree in theology, I would advise against pursuing that degree. You should study something related to the genre that you want to teach. If you are completely unable to do a MS in EE or computer science, you might consider a graduate program in Business. The theology degree would pigeon hole you too much.

That's a good point I hadn't thought of.
 
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