Looking for a Technical Commentary on the Psalms

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TheInquirer

Puritan Board Freshman
I am looking for a technical commentary on the Psalms 1-50 (especially strong in linguistics, grammar, psalm structure) and trying to decide on the second edition of Craigie in WBC or Allen Ross' volume. Reviews are rather sparse online of each. I have not had Hebrew so I am fairly weak in that area.

For reference, I already have the following:

VanGemeren
Boice
Spurgeon
Plumer
Calvin
Wilson (NIVAC)

Anyone used Craigie or Ross or have another technical resource they find valuable?
 

Regi Addictissimus

Completely sold out to the King
I am about to review Ross's set for work. Thus far, I have not had a chance to use them.
Upon a quick glance, he does seem to interact with Hebrew a decent amount. It isn't enough where it would be a hindrance. Do you have an interlinear?
I have heard troubling things about the Psalms contribution in the NICOT series.
There is always Keil & Delitzsch for a commentary that will interact heavily with the Hebrew.
John Gill is good for getting a blend of Reformed and a historical Jewish interpretation. David Dickson is by no means technical but it is edifying.
 

TheInquirer

Puritan Board Freshman
I use Logos extensively so I have plenty of lexicons and language dictionaries. I just need help with which sense is the best in the context, use of word plays and metaphors vs. literal sense, grammar - that kind of thing.
 

iainduguid

Puritan Board Sophomore
I normally have mixed feelings about Anchor Bible. However, when they get scholars who actually care, they overachieve. Dahood uses insight from Ugaritic and simply delivers in terms of material.
Well...maybe. The view of my professors at Cambridge back in the day was that Dahood was brilliantly right about 10% of the time and idiosyncratically wrong 90% of the time in his insistence that seemingly every difficult passage has a previously unknown Semitic root behind it. The trouble is, it's hard for non-Ugaritic specialists to know which is which. Certainly, it's not the first critical commentary on the psalms I would turn to for insight. Craigie is much more helpful for the average pastor, as is Ross. Keil & Delitzsch maintains some value even after so long. If you want another commentary to add (to be read with discernment) Goldingay might be worth a punt.
 

BayouHuguenot

Puritanboard Clerk
Well...maybe. The view of my professors at Cambridge back in the day was that Dahood was brilliantly right about 10% of the time and idiosyncratically wrong 90% of the time in his insistence that seemingly every difficult passage has a previously unknown Semitic root behind it. The trouble is, it's hard for non-Ugaritic specialists to know which is which. Certainly, it's not the first critical commentary on the psalms I would turn to for insight. Craigie is much more helpful for the average pastor, as is Ross. Keil & Delitzsch maintains some value even after so long. If you want another commentary to add (to be read with discernment) Goldingay might be worth a punt.

Well said. I stand corrected. I would go with Craigie in that case.
 

Regi Addictissimus

Completely sold out to the King
I normally have mixed feelings about Anchor Bible. However, when they get scholars who actually care, they overachieve. Dahood uses insight from Ugaritic and simply delivers in terms of material.
Richard, where would you put Harman on the pastoral-academic spectrum?

I have the Harmon volumes. In my opinion, Harman would be in the pastoral spectrum with minimal interaction with the Hebrew. I may be wrong but that has been my experience when I have consulted him. You said that you are on Psalm 46, here is an excerpt:

1. A Safe Stronghold (vv. 1–3)

God is our refuge and strength, an ever-present help in trouble (v. 1). A favourite theme of many of the psalms is the fact that God is the refuge of his people (e.g., 61:3; 62:7–8; 71:7; 142:5). The words ‘refuge’ (machaseh) and ‘strength’ (ʿoz) are often used in conjunction to depict God’s character and his actions on behalf of his people. The confession here is communal (for the Hebrew text has ‘for us’; and also in vv. 7 and 11). The people acknowledge that when in trouble God is near to help. The translation ‘an ever-present help’ is a traditional one, but the MT simply says ‘in trouble he will be found a help—exceedingly.’ The emphasis should rather fall on how great a help the LORD is, rather than trying to describe its continuous nature.
Therefore we will not fear, though the earth give way and the mountains fall into the heart of the sea, though its waters roar and foam and the mountains quake with their surging. Selah (vv. 2–3). The troubles they had faced (including the most recent battles) are described as if there was a tremendous upheaval of nature. A mighty earthquake has taken place, but amidst everything the people can say: ‘We will not fear.’ This is based on what has been asserted about God in verse 1. The sea may be used as a symbol for the world as it is agitated by sinful desires of kings and empires. Insufficient detail is given to locate the psalm in a specific historical context.
There is a river whose streams make glad the city of God, the holy place where the Most High dwells. God is within her, she will not fall; God will help her at break of day (vv. 4–5). While the term ‘Zion’ is not used, the psalmist now describes how secure the people are because God has his dwelling in Jerusalem. In other Old Testament passages we also have the picture of Jerusalem, with water streaming from her (cf. Isa. 33:21). God’s sanctuary was in Jerusalem, and as long as the people trusted his provision for them, then his help would never fail. When they despised the softly flowing waters of Siloam, then God would abandon them (Isa. 8:5–8). God ‘had pity on his people and his dwelling place’ until the people mocked his messengers and ultimately the sanctuary itself was destroyed by the Babylonians (2 Chron. 36:15–19). The psalmist’s language about Jerusalem idealises the topographical situation, as no ‘river’ gladdens the sanctuary. The Kidron only flows for a few weeks in winter, while the spring of Gihon struggles to fill the pool of Siloam.


Harman, Allan. Psalms: A Mentor Commentary. Vol. 1–2. Ross-shire, Great Britain: Mentor, 2011. Print. Mentor Commentaries.



Harmon's isn't bad. He won't fill your appetite for a technical commentary. You get one or two pages per Psalm with Harmon. Ross has the ability to go a lot deeper into the text as his commentary is three volumes.
 

TheInquirer

Puritan Board Freshman
Thanks Robert, yes that is a bit too light for my needs. My other commentaries fill that void quite well.
 

bookslover

Puritan Board Doctor
Richard, where would you put Harman on the pastoral-academic spectrum?

I would say that he's technical, but not overly so. He good theological insights and is a good writer (something you can't say too often about commentaries!). A good blend of Hebrew insights, theology, and application. As I said, I read it through twice.
 
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