KJV study bible?

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beej6

Puritan Board Sophomore
A friend of mine is asking for a KJV study Bible. He may not be Reformed, but I would get him a Reformed (or Reformed friendly) one anyway. Recommendations?
 

VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
Originally posted by VirginiaHuguenot
It's worth noting that a 1672 edition of the King James Version with 1599 Geneva Bible notes (a combination, some might say, of the best Reformation translation with the best Reformation annotations) was published and is available today through SWRB.
 

turmeric

Megerator
Suh-weet! I got a reprint of the 1611, which isn't too bad. Cross-references and somewhat Reformed chapter outlines. That was before King Charles 1 had kicked them all out of the seminaries. The Anglican Church at her best, you might say.
 

beej6

Puritan Board Sophomore
I've seen the SWRB CDs, and while the material is interesting, the Bible recommended above won't do (it's a photocopy). Is the 'generic' Zondervan KJV study bible just that, generic? Dispensational?
 

beej6

Puritan Board Sophomore
Thanks for the pointer to the Matthew Henry. I personally prefer the Reformation Study Bible (ESV) but my friend specifically asked for a KJV. I may break down and get the Zondervan one instead...
 

3John2

Puritan Board Freshman
Since you are looking for a KJV why not a THompson? I know it's not Reformed but still. You also have the Open Bible. Well I liked the OLD Open Bibles those were neat but the newer ones have too many notes. Anyways just my 2 cents.
 

kevin.carroll

Puritan Board Junior
Originally posted by turmeric
Suh-weet! I got a reprint of the 1611, which isn't too bad. Cross-references and somewhat Reformed chapter outlines. That was before King Charles 1 had kicked them all out of the seminaries. The Anglican Church at her best, you might say.

A reprint of a 1611? Are you sure. There are very few people that could actually read one.
 

kevin.carroll

Puritan Board Junior
Unless he is used to Elizabethan English, he would probably do better to get the ESV mentioned above. No sense in putting stumbling blocks in peoples way. The KJV is today's Vulgate. Everyone has one...no one can use it (except those that cut their teeth on it!).
 

beej6

Puritan Board Sophomore
Yes, Kevin, I thought about that too, but my 40 something friend was very specific about the KJV. I was hoping he didn't mean 'NKJV' by mistake. However, he grew up in a Baptist family, small town Indiana, "raised in the faith" as it were, so it's entirely likely the Scripture he knows is the good ol' KJV. He has an NIV given to him in jail, so he'll be fine - he just wanted something with study notes in it.
 

turmeric

Megerator
Originally posted by kevin.carroll
Originally posted by turmeric
Suh-weet! I got a reprint of the 1611, which isn't too bad. Cross-references and somewhat Reformed chapter outlines. That was before King Charles 1 had kicked them all out of the seminaries. The Anglican Church at her best, you might say.

A reprint of a 1611? Are you sure. There are very few people that could actually read one.

Yes, it's put out by Hendrickson Publishers. Maybe it's not, the spellings are certainly archaic, but the print seems too clear. It has an Almanack in the front which I can barely read and a chart telling How to find Easter for Euer, but the years are in Roman numerals.
 

Pilgrim

Puritanboard Commissioner
Originally posted by beej6
I've seen the SWRB CDs, and while the material is interesting, the Bible recommended above won't do (it's a photocopy). Is the 'generic' Zondervan KJV study bible just that, generic? Dispensational?

It is based on the NIV Study Bible if you're familiar with that. It's more generic, not Dispensational at all from my recollection, although I haven't looked at mine much in years. In most stores you can usually look at a copy to see for yourself. On questions like eschatology it tends to present all sides. If anything it may have a slight Reformed influence since many if not most of the contributors to the NIV Study Bible on which it is based are from Reformed backgrounds. The Zondervan series of study bibles (NIV/NASB/KJV) does convey information that is useful, especially for the beginner, but from my recollection it tends to dodge a lot of the hard issues, probably in an attempt to appeal to the broadest possible "evangelical/conservative" audience. Of course they have been very successful doing just that.

The Open Bible has far less notes. While it does have some good study helps (particularly the "cyclopedic index") it is dogmatically dispensationalist from my recollection. It has been reprinted, but I don't know if it's in the KJV anymore. I would recommend the Zondervan over it, or perhaps a Thompson if he's looking for a Bible with helps but not necessarily notes. I'm sure you can't go wrong with the Matthew Henry either.
 

beej6

Puritan Board Sophomore
Thanks Chris, I ended up sending the Zondervan version. I actually only fairly recently realized that they (NIV/NASB/KJV) all use the same set of study notes, and we have the NASB and NIV version(!)
 

Blueridge Believer

Puritan Board Professor
I've got a leather bound Matthew Henry that I enjoy greatly. I am looking forward to getting my new Geneava. My first study bible was a Thompson chain. It's certianly not Dispensational and doesn't try to promote one particular viewpoint. I wish the Reformation Study bible was available in the KJV. I have one in NKJV.
 

3John2

Puritan Board Freshman
Hey no kidding but I actually USE a Dake as my MAIN study bible:candle:I bought it years ago (1994 or so) when I was Charismatic Word of Faith. Anyways I got SO used to it & I have so much highlighting etc in it that I simply can't part with it. Heretical notes aside:bigsmile:I love it because it has SO MANY helpful aids whether they are cross references, Greek/Hebrew word notes, & many other aids. It's actually a pretty good study bible if you know enought to not get thrown off by his Dispensational & Arminian viewpoints. I often wonder what would have happened if Dake had studied at a Reformed Theological School as opposed to an Assembly of God.:detective:
 
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