Kindle users, question on copy and paste.

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PuritanCovenanter

The Joyful Curmudgeon
Staff member
I have only read a few books on my Kindle. There have been times I wanted to quote significant portions or place them in notes other than on the Kindle notes page. I have not found that one can copy and paste from Kindle Books. Have any of you guys learned how to copy and paste from the Kindle Reader software? If so can you share with me how it is done? If I can't..... well, bummer. It only fuels my fire to keep buying hardback real copies of books. Which I think everyone should do anyways. You can read by candle light when the electricity runs out or your battery dies.

Not a fan of electric reading.
 

Logan

Puritan Board Senior
Randy, you can go to this page to see the things you've highlighted. Naturally you would have had turn your wifi or 3G on for it to sync first and show the latest ones. You can copy and paste from that page.

When you highlight something there is also an option (on the Paperwhite at least) to "share" the quote. I don't know how that works as I've never used it but it's worth a try.

It only fuels my fire to keep buying hardback real copies of books.

You know you can't copy and paste from a hardback book ;)
 

PuritanCovenanter

The Joyful Curmudgeon
Staff member
The problem with the highlight page is that it has a very limited amount that will tranfer.

I know you can't copy and paste from a hard copy but having the hard copy does insure the fact that I can pull it from the shelf whenever or where ever I need it or want it. LOL.
 

Logan

Puritan Board Senior
The problem with the highlight page is that it has a very limited amount that will tranfer.

I don't use that page so I wasn't aware of a limit. Is it limited in the amount of text that is displayed of what you highlighted, or limited in the amount you can copy from that page?

I had some multiple-paragraph highlights that showed up in their entirety and I was able to copy and paste them. How long are the passages you're working with?
 

Logan

Puritan Board Senior
Randy, that page is kind of like a summary activity feed I think. Did you try the link I had below? https://kindle.amazon.com/your_highlights

I just tested it by highlighting an entire page in one of my books and the entire highlight shows up on the page I linked to above (for my account of course).
 

KMK

Administrator
Staff member
You have to go into 'settings' and tell it to where you want your highlight sent. (Facebook, for example) Highlight the text. Press 'select' and it will underline it. Move the cursor to the underlined text. Press 'alt' and the 'return' arrow at the same time. Voila, your highlighted text is copied and pasted to Facebook.
 

PuritanCovenanter

The Joyful Curmudgeon
Staff member
Randy, that page is kind of like a summary activity feed I think. Did you try the link I had below? https://kindle.amazon.com/your_highlights

I just tested it by highlighting an entire page in one of my books and the entire highlight shows up on the page I linked to above (for my account of course).

That is what I needed. Thanks Logan. I knew someone would be able to get through and help me. I just couldn't imagine not being able to do this. Thanks Logan.
 

VictorBravo

Administrator
Staff member
I just plug the Kindle into my computer and look for the file called "clippings." (something like that--I'm not near my Kindle right now.)

It's a text file with everything you've highlighted, with time/date headings so you can do a search in the text or scroll through it.
 

kodos

Puritan Board Junior
If you use the PC or Mac Kindle reader, you can copy from within the application. Tried in the Desktop app for Windows 7, and also the Mac app for OS X. For some reason the Windows 8 ("Metro") app and the OS X App Store app dont' seem to have Copy last time I checked. But this is very helpful for me, because I do most of my study on the PC or Mac.
 

PuritanCovenanter

The Joyful Curmudgeon
Staff member
I just got on my PC and Kindle just copies straight from it. I am going to quit using my Ipad for the internet and get another laptop. As much as I paid for the Ipad it should function better than it does. I should have just gotten another Laptop. I am not impressed by IOS. I dumpted my Iphone and went with a Note3 and back to android even.
 

kodos

Puritan Board Junior
Unfortunately the lack of copy functionality is more of an Amazon thing than an Apple thing. For whatever reason, I cannot copy out of the Windows 8 (New Interface) app either. That said, while I use an iPad for reading and web surfing, I do all of my study on my Surface Pro 2. Which is a killer laptop / tablet hybrid for this sort of thing :)
 

Semper Fidelis

2 Timothy 2:24-25
Staff member
You can copy and paste from Kindle for PC. It provides a nice citation.

For example:

1. The root fallacy One of the most enduring of errors, the root fallacy presupposes that every word actually has a meaning bound up with its shape or its components. In this view, meaning is determined by etymology; that is, by the root or roots of a word. How many times have we been told that because the verbal cognate of ἀπόστολος (apostolos, apostle) is ἀποστέλλω (apostellō, I send), the root meaning of “apostle” is “one who is sent”? In the preface of the New King James Bible, we are told that the “literal” meaning of μονογενής (monogenēs) is “only begotten.” [3] Is that true? How often do preachers refer to the verb ἀγαπάω (agapaō, to love), contrast it with ϕιλέω (phileō, to love), and deduce that the text is saying something about a special kind of loving, for no other reason than that ἀγαπάω (agapaō) is used? All of this is linguistic nonsense. We might have guessed as much if we were more acquainted with the etymology of English words. Anthony C. Thiselton offers by way of example our word nice, which comes from the Latin nescius, meaning “ignorant.” [4] Our “good-bye” is a contraction for Anglo-Saxon “God be with you.” Now it may be possible to trace out diachronically just how nescius generated “nice”; it is certainly easy to imagine how “God be with you” came to be contracted to “good-bye.”

Carson, D. A. (1996-03-01). Exegetical Fallacies (p. 28). Baker Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.
 

PuritanCovenanter

The Joyful Curmudgeon
Staff member
I always wanted to be considered as a nice person. Maybe I an nice (having a kind disposition) because I am ignorant. LOL Maybe I am just ignorant. LOL
 
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