Kindle DX Announced

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Beth Ellen Nagle

Puritan Board Senior
I would really like a Kindle or even a Sony Reader. I do prefer reading from a book but I can see the benefit of having one of these for many .pdf articles and books I have bookmarked to read and for cheap electronic books to purchase. It's not top of my list but it is getting closer!
 

Ivan

Pastor
I still prefer paper and ink.

Me too, but that per book price sure makes the Kindle tempting.

Where do you see the price per book?

Here's a link that gives examples of what is offered and at what price...you'll find it at the bottom of the page.

Amazon.com: Kindle DX: Amazon's 9.7" Wireless Reading Device (Latest Generation): Kindle Store

-----Added 5/6/2009 at 01:12:56 EST-----

I'm getting close to pulling the trigger too...but not yet.
 

Seb

Puritan Board Junior
I still prefer paper and ink.

Me too, but that per book price sure makes the Kindle tempting.

Where do you see the price per book?

From: here


More than 275,000 Books


Our vision is to have every book ever printed, in every language, available on Kindle. The Kindle Store currently has more than 275,000 titles and we are adding more every day. Whether you prefer biographies, classics, investment guides, thrillers, or sci-fi, thousands of your favorite books are available. The Kindle Store offers 107 of 112 books currently found on the New York Times® Best Seller list. New York Times Best Sellers and most new releases are $9.99, and you'll find many books for less.

It really depends on the specific book itself, but from what I've seen the Kindle version of a book is a LOT cheaper than the printed version, and you can have it in a few minutes rather than days.

Not to mention all of the PDF books you can d/l to it.
 

NaphtaliPress

Administrator
Staff member
From a publisher's viewpoint, the question is will Amazon carry PDF versions of books and also insure DRM? PDFs on their own are not secure enough in my opinion which is why I don't do ebooks to a large degree.
 

Scottish Lass

Puritan Board Doctor
From a publisher's viewpoint, the question is will Amazon carry PDF versions of books and also insure DRM? PDFs on their own are not secure enough in my opinion which is why I don't do ebooks to a large degree.

Okay, I'm not sure I understood most of that, and since I'm considering a Kindle (kind of, sort of), I'd like to understand what you just said and the implications.
 

NaphtaliPress

Administrator
Staff member
DRM; Digital Rights Management. I've not found any delivery system I'm satisfied protects the book from simply being copied and passed around.
 

DMcFadden

Puritanboard Commissioner
My wife (NOT a techie) loves the Sony Reader I got her last year. She uses it all the time (after swearing that she HATES to read off a computer screen). Evidently, the contrast features are very much like reading a paper and ink book.
 

Scottish Lass

Puritan Board Doctor
DRM; Digital Rights Management. I've not found any delivery system I'm satisfied protects the book from simply being copied and passed around.

Okay, I'm admittedly slow at this--protects the book from the author's perspective or from the customer's perspective?
 

Seb

Puritan Board Junior
DRM; Digital Rights Management. I've not found any delivery system I'm satisfied protects the book from simply being copied and passed around.

Okay, I'm admittedly slow at this--protects the book from the author's perspective or from the customer's perspective?

DRM helps keep copyrighted materials such as ebooks, cds, dvds, video games, etc from being illegally copied and shared/sold.
 

NaphtaliPress

Administrator
Staff member
From the author's / publisher's who expect their wares to fetch a price and not copied and spread around for free.
 

VictorBravo

Administrator
Staff member
DRM; Digital Rights Management. I've not found any delivery system I'm satisfied protects the book from simply being copied and passed around.

Okay, I'm admittedly slow at this--protects the book from the author's perspective or from the customer's perspective?

From the author/publisher's perspective.

Here is the scenario. I write a book, I spend 1600 hours writing it and then hire an editor and publisher to put it together into an attractive package. They do so with the hopes of being paid for their time, I hope to be paid for my time.

So, let's say we put it into a pdf format to sell on the internet. Some enterprising fellow takes the pdf, copies it and maybe strips off the security encoding, and emails it to all his friends. Then someone posts it on the internet for download. Great, now everyone has a copy of my work, and I haven't been paid. It would discourage me and the publisher from trying that again.

It's the major dilemna of our era with regard to published works, either in music or whatever medium.
 

LawrenceU

Puritan Board Doctor
DRM; Digital Rights Management. I've not found any delivery system I'm satisfied protects the book from simply being copied and passed around.

Okay, I'm admittedly slow at this--protects the book from the author's perspective or from the customer's perspective?

DRM helps keep copyrighted materials such as ebooks, cds, dvds, video games, etc from being illegally copied and shared/sold.

It is supposed to. Anything can be hacked, and copy write infringements on digital books (and other media) are routine.
 

Wannabee

Obi Wan Kenobi
I still prefer paper and ink.

Lawrence, when I visited Greg last month he showed me his. Apparently he received it as a gift and said, "I found out I can't live without it." It uses an "electronic ink" that reads just like paper. It really is amazing and easy on the eyes. Apparently you can read 25% faster on paper than on a computer. But with Kindle you read it like a paper. There's no back-light. In fact, you can't read it without light source (they sell an attachable light). And once it puts the "ink" on the page it doesn't use electricity except to "print" the next page, so your batteries last a long time.

When I talked to a friend at Logos I mentioned how much easier it is to read a book, as a opposed to electronic format. He understood, but obviously a book isn't searchable and Logos is great for that. Recently I asked him about having the ability to transfer information between Logos and the Kindle, allowing Logos customers to keep using their books on Kindle without having to repurchase them. He said that the technology wasn't an issue. But copyright laws are not allowing them to do it currently. Perhaps that will change. If it does, then perhaps I'll have to figure out a way to come up with the clams.

For now, I'm sold on Kindle. But the cost isn't something I can live with at the moment.
 

Semper Fidelis

2 Timothy 2:24-25
Staff member
Oooo, I love the fact that this version natively reads PDF's.

Joe: With respect to Logos works, you could do a "as you need it" kind of Kindle read. What I currently do sometimes is copy and paste sections I need to study from Logos and print them to paper so I can study them away from my computer. If you copy and paste to .doc then you would be able to convert to your Kindle for reading.
 

LawrenceU

Puritan Board Doctor
I still prefer paper and ink.

Lawrence, when I visited Greg last month he showed me his. Apparently he received it as a gift and said, "I found out I can't live without it." It uses an "electronic ink" that reads just like paper. It really is amazing and easy on the eyes. Apparently you can read 25% faster on paper than on a computer. But with Kindle you read it like a paper. There's no back-light. In fact, you can't read it without light source (they sell an attachable light). And once it puts the "ink" on the page it doesn't use electricity except to "print" the next page, so your batteries last a long time.

When I talked to a friend at Logos I mentioned how much easier it is to read a book, as a opposed to electronic format. He understood, but obviously a book isn't searchable and Logos is great for that. Recently I asked him about having the ability to transfer information between Logos and the Kindle, allowing Logos customers to keep using their books on Kindle without having to repurchase them. He said that the technology wasn't an issue. But copyright laws are not allowing them to do it currently. Perhaps that will change. If it does, then perhaps I'll have to figure out a way to come up with the clams.

For now, I'm sold on Kindle. But the cost isn't something I can live with at the moment.

That is interesting, Joe. I wasn't aware that you are not looking at a lit screen.
 

Semper Fidelis

2 Timothy 2:24-25
Staff member
I still prefer paper and ink.

Lawrence, when I visited Greg last month he showed me his. Apparently he received it as a gift and said, "I found out I can't live without it." It uses an "electronic ink" that reads just like paper. It really is amazing and easy on the eyes. Apparently you can read 25% faster on paper than on a computer. But with Kindle you read it like a paper. There's no back-light. In fact, you can't read it without light source (they sell an attachable light). And once it puts the "ink" on the page it doesn't use electricity except to "print" the next page, so your batteries last a long time.

When I talked to a friend at Logos I mentioned how much easier it is to read a book, as a opposed to electronic format. He understood, but obviously a book isn't searchable and Logos is great for that. Recently I asked him about having the ability to transfer information between Logos and the Kindle, allowing Logos customers to keep using their books on Kindle without having to repurchase them. He said that the technology wasn't an issue. But copyright laws are not allowing them to do it currently. Perhaps that will change. If it does, then perhaps I'll have to figure out a way to come up with the clams.

For now, I'm sold on Kindle. But the cost isn't something I can live with at the moment.

That is interesting, Joe. I wasn't aware that you are not looking at a lit screen.

[bible]Prov 18:17[/bible]

:lol:

The electronic ink is the reason why this device is so popular. A lot of people that never thought they would read on anything but paper have used this thing and loved it. I hate reading lengthy works from the computer and I've sort of been waiting for the 2nd and 3rd gens of this Kindle to come out so I can finally take the plunge.
 

OPC'n

Puritan Board Doctor
I love my Kindle 2. I don't think I would want something bigger than it. It really is worth the money!!
 

LawrenceU

Puritan Board Doctor
Proverbs 18:17

17 The one who states his case first seems right,
until the other comes and examines him. (ESV)

:lol:

But, does it smell like a book? Can they replicate that wonderful tactile feel? That swathing of the senses with the aroma of old volumes, long smoked pipes, and leather? There are things that are important, you know. :)
 

Semper Fidelis

2 Timothy 2:24-25
Staff member
Proverbs 18:17

17 The one who states his case first seems right,
until the other comes and examines him. (ESV)

:lol:

But, does it smell like a book? Can they replicate that wonderful tactile feel? That swathing of the senses with the aroma of old volumes, long smoked pipes, and leather? There are things that are important, you know. :)

My problem right now is that I have books piled up all over the floor and have to buy another bookcase for all of them. Maybe you could buy some "old book" freshener and spray it on a Kindle.

Personally, I'd love to have all the books I want to read in electronic format in Logos (so I could find them when I needed to reference something) and in a format I could read (like paper) when I want to sit and study or read for pleasure.

My car has two crates in the back with my textbooks, bibles and other reading material I want accessible. When I go to the gym I have to make sure I have the right books with me and then I also have to make sure I bring my book clip with me to hold the pages open. I'd love to just have the Kindle and clean out the back of my car but I doubt most of the books I'll want are in the format I need them.
 

LawrenceU

Puritan Board Doctor
All kidding aside, since reading the 'ink' issue. I may have to take a look at one if my ship ever pulls alongside the pier. I have books all over the place. And, I have dozens of boxes of them in storage. I could fill a modest sized library. I also am constantly lugging two briefcases everywhere so that I can keep my current work handy. I use Logos on my Mac and love it for its powerful search engine, but I can't spend hours on a computer screen doing serious reading. Perhaps the Kindle would help spare my shoulders.
 

fredtgreco

Vanilla Westminsterian
Staff member
Has anyone here used the Kindle DX? I am very seriously thinking of getting either it or the second generation. What are the major differences?
 

Wayne

Tempus faciendi, Domine.
A few months ago I came across this article online, "Three Arguments against the Kindle" [http://www.inhabitatiodei.com/2009/04/23/three-arguments-against-the-kindle/], linked from Jake Belder's blog, café de soirée

To sum up the article:

Argument one: The Kindle destroys the trace of the author.
Argument two: the Kindle destroys the community of readers which books engender.
Argument three: the Kindle denies the call to deep, meditative reflection.

Whaddaya think? Talk among yourselves...
 
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