James Reid

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VirginiaHuguenot

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James Reid, Scottish Reformed Presbyterian (August 12, 1750 -- November 4, 1837) was the author of Memoirs of the Westminster Divines (1811). He was ordained in 1783 by the Reformed Presbytery of Scotland and called in 1789 to support the Reformed Presbyterians in America, which he did from 1789 to 1790. He separated from the Reformed Presbytery of Scotland in 1825 following their 1822 revision of the church constitution.

From W. Melancthon Glasgow, History of the Reformed Presbyterian Church in America:

JAMES REID:

Was born in the parish of Shotts, Scotland, August 12, 1750. He received the rudiments of an education in the schools of his native parish, and graduated from Edinburgh College in 1776. He studied theology in the Seminary of Stirling, Scotland, and was licensed by the Reformed Presbytery of Scotland, April 27, 1780. He was ordained by the same court, and installed pastor of the united congregations of Wigtown and Kirkcudbright, Scotland, July 10, 1783. It was during this period that the few faithful Covenanters in America were deprived of all their ministry by defection, and made urgent application to the Reformed Presbytery of Scotland for ministerial assistance. After much serious deliberation, Mr. Reid accepted the appointment to visit America, and left Scotland, August 4, 1789. He visited all the Covenanter societies from New York to the Carolinas, organized many congregations, and dispensed the sacraments. He returned to Scotland, July 16, 1790. He resumed his labors with renewed diligence among his flock, which was soon afterwards reduced by the Stranraer society being organized into a separate congregation, and he continued in charge of Newton-Stewart, Whithorn and Castle Douglas. In 1825, in consequence of a decision of the Synod to erase the particular mention of the Auchensaugh renovation of the Covenants from the terms of communion, he regarded it a departure from the Testimony, and withdrew, with a few followers, from the communion of the Reformed Presbyterian Church, and maintained a separate standing. In the spring of 1828, he removed to the city of Glasgow, Scotland, where he resided with his daughter, Mrs. Stewart, continued to preach to a few people until old age caused his strength to fail, and where he died of a severe illness, November 4, 1837.

He married Miss Helen Bland, of Anworth, Scotland, December 26, 1786. He was a good man, full of the Holy Ghost and of faith. Notwithstanding the checkered career of his life, and the unfavorable circumstances for study, he was an acceptable and edifying preacher, and did not fail to raise his voice against personal and national evils. He was distinguished for his gravity of deportment, kindliness of manner, and regularity in the performance of religious duties. During his last days his eyesight failed him, yet he desired to have his books beside him, from which others read to him, imparting subjects for meditation and prayer. Among his publications extant are: “The Lives of the Westminster Divines,” in two volumes. “The Divinity of Christ,” 1792, pp. 60. “The Incarnation,” 1794, pp. 68.
 
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