J. C. Ryle on Christ weeping at the grave of Lazarus

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Reformed Covenanter

Puritanboard Commissioner
This weeping of Christ is deeply instructive. It shows us that it is not sinful to sorrow. Weeping and mourning are sadly trying to flesh and blood, and make us feel the weakness of our mortal nature. But they are not in themselves wrong. Even the Son of God wept.—It shows us that deep feeling is not a thing of which we need be ashamed. To be cold and stoical and unmoved in the sight of sorrow is no sign of grace. There is nothing unworthy of a child of God in tears.

Even the Son of God could weep.—It shows us, above all, that the Saviour in whom believers trust is a most tender and feeling Saviour. He is one who can be touched with sympathy for our infirmities. When we turn to Him in the hour of trouble, and pour out our hearts before Him, He knows what we go through and can pity. And He is One who never changes. Though He now sits at God’s right hand in heaven, His heart is still the same that it was upon earth. We have an Advocate with the Father, who, when He was upon earth, could weep. ...

For more, see J. C. Ryle on Christ weeping at the grave of Lazarus.
 

Reformed Covenanter

Puritanboard Commissioner
I am just reading through this commentary. Very good.

I just finished the third volume a couple of days ago. It really is an outstanding commentary on John's gospel. The references and quotations in the critical notes to some commentators whose writings are only available in Latin are especially useful.
 

retroGRAD3

Puritan Board Freshman
As a note, the kindle version of this commentary is actually free right now on Amazon:


It looks like this might be a condensed version though. Now that you mention volumes, I am seeing that I might not have the full thing.
 
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