Is the Synagogue or the NT our Model for Meeting?

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JBaldwin

Puritan Board Post-Graduate
In the thread on musical instruments in worship, I made the statement below. At least one person indicated that they would like to discuss this further as would I. Here is my original statement:

For a further point, and perhaps this actually should be the beginning of a different thread. My understanding of worship is that we worship all the time, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. When we come together, I see the New Testament instructing us to meet together for teaching, admonishing with psalms, hymns and spiritual songs, preaching, encouraging one another, prayer, fellowship, Lord's table, baptism (though we are not commanded to meet for that purpose, it makes perfect sense). When the early synagogue met, they met for readings from the Torah, psalms, hymns, prayers and almsgiving. Though many of these things cross over, why are we using the synagogue as a model for worship as your above post implies instead of using the NT guidelines?


It is often argued that the reason why we should sing psalms exclusively or why we should have no instruments in worship is because that's what they did in the Synagogue. Aren't we supposed to do what the Scriptures tell us to do? The Synagogue system was put in place long before the New Testament, and I do not believe that we should be looking to the Jews for our example as to what to do when we come together as believers. We should be looking to the New Testament.

JBaldwin
 

Anton Bruckner

Puritan Board Professor
The Synagogue system was put in place long before the New Testament, and I do not believe that we should be looking to the Jews for our example as to what to do when we come together as believers. We should be looking to the New Testament.

JBaldwin
We ought not to look to the Jews, but we ought to look to the Bible which is God's revealed word and whether we like it or not, God did use the Jews as a means to manifest His will in how He ought to be worshiped. And it was the synagogue system that Jesus willingly submitted to, and it was the synagogue system that the Apostles used when the church was officially inaugurated after the Ascension of our Lord. When the Apostles went about the Roman Empire planting churches it was the synagogue system that they used. If we get into adding things to worship that is not mandated in scripture we run the risk of being the sons of Aaron that offered strange fire before the Lord.
 

Southern Presbyterian

Puritan Board Doctor
It is often argued that the reason why we should sing psalms exclusively or why we should have no instruments in worship is because that's what they did in the Synagogue. Aren't we supposed to do what the Scriptures tell us to do? The Synagogue system was put in place long before the New Testament, and I do not believe that we should be looking to the Jews for our example as to what to do when we come together as believers. We should be looking to the New Testament.

JBaldwin

I'm wondering the same and had thought about starting a similar thread myself. However, I'm not ready to argue points on either side because I've not given the matter any serious study, yet. But I am looking forward to seeing what other more learned and informed folks have to say about this topic.
 

JohnV

Puritan Board Post-Graduate
This is a point where I disagree with some other members on this Board. I think it relates back to our differences on the RPW.

Personally, I see red flags when I see something like that, J.
 

BayouHuguenot

Puritanboard Clerk
RC Sproul Jr justified his use of "Covenant Renewal" liturgy saying he was indeed basing his worship service on the Word of God, particurlaly the Old Testament temple pictures. Further, he argued, that the modern Reformed services, of 3 songs and a lecture, is no more based on the bible than his. And then there was some connection on how he was looking to the temple and other reformed people were looking to the synagogue.

don't quite know if I buy it, but that's his argument.
 

JohnV

Puritan Board Post-Graduate
I can tell you, Patrick, how to figure it out.

VI. The whole counsel of God concerning all things necessary for his own glory, man's salvation, faith and life, is either expressly set down in Scripture, or by good and necessary consequence may be deduced from Scripture: unto which nothing at any time is to be added, whether by new revelations of the Spirit, or traditions of men.[12] Nevertheless, we acknowledge the inward illumination of the Spirit of God to be necessary for the saving understanding of such things as are revealed in the Word:[13] and that there are some circumstances concerning the worship of God, and government of the church, common to human actions and societies, which are to be ordered by the light of nature, and Christian prudence, according to the general rules of the Word, which are always to be observed.[14]

12. II Tim. 3:16-17; Gal. 1:8-9; II Thess. 2:2
13. John 6:45; I Cor. 2:12, 14-15; Eph. 1:18; II Cor. 4:6
14. I Cor. 11:13-14; 14:26, 40

Notice especially, "all things necessary for his own glory, man's salvation, faith and life, is either expressly set down in Scripture, or by good and necessary consequence may be deduced from Scripture."

It's nice to be a history student, but the plain reading of the Word of God is still the norm. What is required for the worship of God is either expressly set down in Scripture or is by necessity laid upon us. That is: if it is not expressly written, then all other views are expressly obviated. The point is that there's no room for human conjecture, no matter how holy the conjecturists may be.
 

MW

Puritanboard Amanuensis
The temple was typical, and Christ is the *eschatological* fulfilment of the temple; so that the temple and its services have been rendered old and "ready to vanish away," according to the New Testament perspective. The synagogue, on the other hand, was an ordinary "meeting," or "assembly," which continues on in the gathering together of Jew/Gentile congregations. Christian congregations, then, are the *historical* continuum of the synagogue. In Heb 10:25, to not forsake the assembling of yourselves together, is literally to not forsake coming to the synagogue (episunagogen).
 

JohnV

Puritan Board Post-Graduate
My profile says that I have just above 3000 posts on this Board. If you count the some odd 1000 that this count was reduced by when we were experiencing several "phantom" glitches with the program under which this Board operated, then I would have above 4000. That means that there would have been roughly 12000 posts that didn't get posted, or in whose stead I posted a much edited replacement. I've been biting my tongue a lot.

But trying to be very judicious here, there are some things that I force upon myself never to say. There are ordinary parishoners (members of a congregation) which are members on this Board, as well as a few of their overseers. The trust that must be maintained between these parties is of the utmost importance. So I may not breach that merely for the sake of expressing my opinions. I have freedom to speak, but I also have freedom to refrain from speaking, as the expediency demands.

I've said enough.
 
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