Is the KJV Bible copyrighted?

Discussion in 'FAQ & Rules' started by Nathan A. Hughes, Jun 22, 2018.

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  1. Nathan A. Hughes

    Nathan A. Hughes Puritan Board Freshman

    If you were to write a book and quote the KJV in it multi times would you need to get permission to do this like with other versions such as ESV, NASB and NIV?
     
  2. greenbaggins

    greenbaggins Administrator Staff Member

    Nathan, technically, the Queen of England holds the copyright to the KJV. I have seen some books where the author acknowledges this fact, but they are few and far between. Practically speaking, very few people ask permission to use it in their books.
     
  3. Jack K

    Jack K Puritan Board Professor

    Where are you publishing? In the US, the KJV is in public domain and there are no restrictions. But in the UK, the translation is owned by the crown and published by Cambridge, and there are restrictions and notification rules similar to those for other translations.

    For most books, you do not have to seek special permission anyway unless the Bible is very heavily quoted; you are only required to give notice on the copyright page that you are using that translation. Typically, for example, you'll be allowed to have up to 25% of your book be Bible quotes as long as you don't exceed 500 verses (some copyright holders are even more generous, and a few are less generous). Check the version you plan to use; the limits and the wording for your copyright page are usually printed on their copyright page. For the KJV in the UK, the limits are no more than 25% of the book, not to exceed 500 verses.

    Finally, I would suggest that even if you hope to publish in the US using the KJV, so that no restrictions apply, you still note on the copyright page that you are using the KJV. Some readers might like to know, and it is a customary courtesy to acknowledge any borrowed material.
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2018
  4. yeutter

    yeutter Puritan Board Senior

    "Rights in the Authorized (King James) Version of the Bible are vested in the Crown" "Rights in the Authorized (King James) Version of the Bible are administered in the United Kingdom by the Crown's patentee, Cambridge University Press. Applications for permission for liturgical or non-commercial educational use up to a maximum of 500 verses (or less than a full book) not required. Other uses subject to written permission being obtained from the Permissions Department, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge CB2 8RU (www.cambridge.org)"
     
  5. Ryan&Amber2013

    Ryan&Amber2013 Puritan Board Junior

    It is copyrighted by God, it says so at the end of Revelation - haha
     
  6. Brian R.

    Brian R. Puritan Board Freshman

    Jack makes a great suggestion. I dislike it when a book doesn't tell me which translation was used. Many times I'll buy or not buy a work based on the scripture references.
     
  7. Nathan A. Hughes

    Nathan A. Hughes Puritan Board Freshman

    Many Thanks for your reply. Very helpful.
     
  8. Nathan A. Hughes

    Nathan A. Hughes Puritan Board Freshman

    I hope to publish in the UK. Many Thanks for your reply. Very helpful. I don't think it will go over 500 verses, but I will check.
     
  9. Jack K

    Jack K Puritan Board Professor

    Since you hope to publish in the UK, you will need the appropriate credit line. For the KJV, the one requested by the publisher reads: "Scripture quotations from the Authorized (King James) Version. Rights in the Authorized Version in the United Kingdom are vested in the Crown. Reproduced by permission of the Crown's patentee, Cambridge University Press." Simply include that credit line on the copyright page of your book and keep to the 25%/500 verses restriction, and you'll be fine.
     
  10. Edward

    Edward Puritan Board Doctor

    Maybe, maybe not. Is it clear in the thread that it's

    ?
     
  11. bookslover

    bookslover Puritan Board Doctor

    Whispers (or, you could have mercy on modern readers and not use the KJV)

    Sneaks off in his very squeaky tennis shoes...
     
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