If You Were To Name A Son After A Scotsman?

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Rutherglen1794

Puritan Board Junior
Hello,

My wife and I are very near the birth of our third child, Lord willing.

If it is a boy, my naming criteria will be the same as the last two: names must be from Scottish Christians of the past, or family names.

First two were:

William James Allen Cross (William Allen Cross being the great-great-great-great grandfather who came to Canada from Scotland.

Samuel John Knox Cross (Samuel we liked, John Knox is self-explanatory)

Now I am trying to decide upon a third-if it is indeed a boy.

Which Scottish Christian of the past would you choose to incorporate in a son’s name? And why?

Right now I’m sitting on Rutherford and M’Cheyne.
 

bookslover

Puritan Board Doctor
Make sure you spell M'Cheyne with the usually-for-some-reason-missing c.

(For some reason, when I posted this, the first "c" went missing and was replaced by the apostrophe, even though I spelled it correctly. Weird.)
 

Rutherglen1794

Puritan Board Junior
Make sure you spell M'Cheyne with the usually-for-some-reason-missing c.

(For some reason, when I posted this, the first "c" went missing and was replaced by the apostrophe, even though I spelled it correctly. Weird.)
How did he spell it? I’ve always seen it as M’Cheyne. As strange as that seems to me.
 

Tom Hart

Puritan Board Senior
There are plenty of Covenanters I could think of.

How about Archie? :) I love the words of Archibald Campbell, 1st Earl of Argyll:
"In the midst of a cloud, I have found a fair sunshine."

There's Richard Cameron, a great Covenanter who bore two names that wouldn't raise any modern eyebrows (compared to "Archibald Campbell, 1st Earl of Argyll Cross").
 

Rutherglen1794

Puritan Board Junior
Samuel Rutherford
Robert Murray M’Cheyne
James Durham
Archibald Campbell
Richard Cameron
William Cunningham
Robert Bruce

Hmm
 

Joshua

Administrator
Staff member
After A Scotsman would work, I suppose, though calling his name aloud in public places would generally cause confusion. What does the middle initial stand for?
 

PuritanCovenanter

Moderator
Staff member
I did name my third son Samuel Rutherford Snyder.

His Letters are such a blessing and have a Pastor's heart behind them. He was one of the Commissioners of the Westminster Assembly and I just love his theology as I see it to represent a good image of our God. I also wrote a short biography on him later for Dr. Blackwood's Seminary History class. It also won a contest with Reformed Forum.

https://rpcnacovenanter.wordpress.com/2012/09/01/samuel-rutherford/
 

Bill The Baptist

Puritan Board Graduate
After A Scotsman would work, I suppose, though calling his name aloud in public places would generally cause confusion. What does the middle initial stand for?
Your humor reminds me of a professor I once had who would say things like “Do Catholics really believe that Mary was taken up into heaven? Or is it just an assumption?”
 

Regi Addictissimus

Completely sold out to the King
If the Lord blesses my wife and I with children and they were boys, I would choose from the following in order:
Robert Baillie
Alexander Hemderso
William Guthrie
George Wishart
Hugh Martin
John Livingstone
Donal Cargill
Richard Cameron
 
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Jo_Was

Puritan Board Freshman
A family name, but Moses. My husband's mother's line traces back to the Covenanter's and Moses Waddel was the great grandson of John Waddel (martyr from the battle of Bothwell Bridge, and grandson of William Waddel who was a survivor of the ship of Covenanters that sunk off the Orkney islands). Moses is the first generation in America, and one of the last Reformed Christians in the family line (that is before Jake was providentially brought to the Reformed faith!). Moses was instrumental in the formation of the First Presbytery of Georgia, and was thought of dearly by his own children and descendants as one of the last great stalwarts of Old School Presbyterianism. Moses was sickly, but used mightily, much like his Biblical counterpart, and I just think that would be a beautiful name to pass down.

I'd be both drawn to and scared to name my kid after an intense Covenanter, lest his personality be too much to handle in his youth because of his namesake. :bouncy:I'd still probably choose one of the Covenanters.
 

iainduguid

Puritan Board Sophomore
Difference of opinions here.
I suspect the abbreviation M'Cheyne has to do with the difficulty of producing
M'Cheyne (with a superscripted "c") on an old fashioned typewriter/typesetting. The name itself is clearly Mc-Cheyne but even in the computer age, I can't figure out how to produce it on this site. I tried cutting and pasting it and the site autocorrected it to a quotation mark! In contrast, producing a quotation mark is easy.
 

Rutherglen1794

Puritan Board Junior
I suspect the abbreviation M'Cheyne has to do with the difficulty of producing
M'Cheyne (with a superscripted "c") on an old fashioned typewriter/typesetting. The name itself is clearly Mc-Cheyne but even in the computer age, I can't figure out how to produce it on this site. I tried cutting and pasting it and the site autocorrected it to a quotation mark! In contrast, producing a quotation mark is easy.
I guess that makes some sense. I always wondered why it was M’Cheyne.

But then why is not every Mc and Mac name of that era treated the same? Why did only a few get changed, while the rest stayed the same?
 
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