Help Regarding Sabbath

Discussion in 'Theological Forum' started by TaylorOtwell, Apr 14, 2008.

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  1. TaylorOtwell

    TaylorOtwell Puritan Board Junior

    Hi friends,

    I have learned more and more about the Reformed perspective over the past year or so. However, one thing I am currently wrestling with is the issue of the Sabbath.

    I understand and agree that the Lord's Day was the traditional and accepted meeting time for the early church. However, I don't understand how many of the Jewish Sabbath stipulations got moved to this day, or where Scripture indicates that they did.

    What Biblical evidence do we have that would support the view that Jewish Sabbath stipulations carried over onto the Lord's Day?

    The position I am more familiar with is a New Covenant Theology position that states that there is no distinction between moral/ceremonial/civil law and that the entire law of Moses is abrogated in the life of the believer. Therefore, only the commandments of Christ and His Apostles are binding on the believer. In other words, this position does not equate the Ten Commandments with the immutable, absolute moral law of God.

    What evidence do we have that demonstrates that the Ten Commandments are that absolute moral law of God; therefore, binding on all people everywhere for all time.
     
  2. AV1611

    AV1611 Puritan Board Senior

    I would suggest:

    1. [ame="http://www.amazon.com/First-Day-Week-Christian-Sabbath/dp/1903087953/ref=sr_11_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1208197874&sr=11-1"]On the First Day of the Week: God, the Christian and the Sabbath[/ame]

    2. The Perpetuity and Change of the Sabbath
     
  3. KMK

    KMK Administrator Staff Member

  4. Blueridge Believer

    Blueridge Believer Puritan Board Professor

    :ditto: This was the book that pushed me over the edge. You can read it in less than an hour.
     
  5. larryjf

    larryjf Puritan Board Senior

    If there is no distinction between the ceremonial, civil, and moral law, why were only the priests permitted to perform the ceremonial law...why were the kings in charge of the civil law...why was everyone under the moral law?

    How far is this belief of no more law outside of the NT taken?

    Do we allow our daughters to be prostitutes because the NT doesn't forbid it (Lev 19:29)?

    Is it o.k. to cut ourselves for the dead (Lev 19:28)?

    Is rape o.k. (Deu 22:25)?
     
  6. TaylorOtwell

    TaylorOtwell Puritan Board Junior

    The typical response I think you would receive would be that commands regarding adultery are given in the New Covenant Scripture. Similarly, we know that cutting ourselves for the dead has no bearing on their eternal state because no man comes to the Father except by Jesus Christ.

    Thank you all for your responses, I plan to read through that Pink article.
     
  7. Backwoods Presbyterian

    Backwoods Presbyterian Puritan Board Doctor

    Good choices I would also recommend Joey Pipa's Book, The Lord's Day
     
  8. larryjf

    larryjf Puritan Board Senior

    I thought that prostitution was different from adultery.

    Also, the NT does teach that the Sabbath was indeed made for man...in other words for man to observe (Mark 2:27).
     
  9. VirginiaHuguenot

    VirginiaHuguenot Puritanboard Librarian

    You may wish to study the teaching of the Westminster Confession and Larger Catechism on this subject and the scriptures they cite in support of this doctrine.

    WCF 19:

    WLC:

     
  10. Southern Presbyterian

    Southern Presbyterian Moderator Staff Member

    :ditto:
     
  11. Grymir

    Grymir Puritan Board Graduate

    Hi Taylor! I was intrigued by your opening post. I noticed on your bio that you say you were converted as a sophomore in college, and attend a PCA church. I hope that what you said isn't being taught in a PCA church, so I was wondering, is this something you pick up elsewhere (if so, where?), or is this something that a friend is asking you about(also, if so, where did he get it?) This is an interesting view, and I can't quit put my finger on which denomination or church teaches this. I interact with alot of people in the world, so I hear all kinds of things. And got curious.

    In one sense, Jesus did fulfill all of the moral/ceremonial/civil law and applied it to us when we 'got saved', but the 10 commandments spells out what sin is and is a guide to Christian living. (The book of Romans does a good job at explaining this).

    Thanks for any input - Grymir
     
  12. Beoga

    Beoga Puritan Board Freshman

    I recently purchased this book and started skimming through it today. It looked pretty good. My one beef with the book is that I spent more on shipping than on the book itself :rolleyes:..
     
  13. A5pointer

    A5pointer Puritan Board Sophomore

    Reformed Baptists
     
  14. JonathanHunt

    JonathanHunt Puritan Board Senior

    Er... no. That is just a broad brush sweep. Being a reformed baptist does not make you an adherent of New Covenant Theology (NCT). I am certainly still convinced that the Ten Commandments stand.

    JH
     
  15. A5pointer

    A5pointer Puritan Board Sophomore

    Sorry didn't mean to broadbrush. He asked where can it be taught? I know some of it is coming from Reformed Baptists. I have no idea what percentage it would be.
     
  16. KMK

    KMK Administrator Staff Member

    How can a Baptist call himself 'Reformed' and yet adhere to NCT? If he is 'reformed' he must adhere to the LBC II, no? Perhaps the folks you are thinking of are 'calvanistic' but not reformed.
     
  17. Blueridge Believer

    Blueridge Believer Puritan Board Professor

    It comes from some Calvinistic baptists, indy fundy and arminian Southern baptists. It does not come from 1689 confessional baptists.
     
  18. A5pointer

    A5pointer Puritan Board Sophomore


    What does D.A. Carson call himself? Am I wrong thinking he is sypathetic to the view?
     
  19. Blueridge Believer

    Blueridge Believer Puritan Board Professor


    True there are some who call themselves confessional who reject the perpetuity of the sabbath just as there are among Presbyterians. They are the exception to the rule and not the rule.
     
  20. TaylorOtwell

    TaylorOtwell Puritan Board Junior

    No, the PCA church I attend does not teach this. I have been learning more and more about the wide range of beliefs that are "Reformed" (not just the five points). I was raised in the SBC, so I am obviously wrestling with issues such as the Sabbath and Baptism.

    As far as who believes NCT, there seems to be a growing interest in it among Calvinistic Baptist churches. The 1st London Confession (1644/1646), which was a different group of men than the editors of the 2nd London Confession, could possibly be cited as a historic example of it. Also, William Gadsby's Catechism seems to outline the belief as well.
     
  21. JM

    JM Puritan Board Professor

  22. Reformed Covenanter

    Reformed Covenanter Puritan Board Doctor

    I think D.A. Carson is a NCT man; he rejects the abiding validity of the Sabbath, but is very Calvinistic in his doctrine. He would probably call himself Reformed as well.

    Despite my differences with him on the Sabbath, infant baptism, Theonomy, inclusive language and so on, DA Carson is one of the best preachers I have ever heard.
     
  23. Grymir

    Grymir Puritan Board Graduate

    Thanks y'all for the input. It's interesting you mentioned Reformed Baptist. I'm considering switching from PCUSA/Westminster to Reformed Baptist/London because I'm not a Covenant theologian, and well, need I explain the PCUSA?

    quote - "The position I am more familiar with is a New Covenant Theology position that states that there is no distinction between moral/ceremonial/civil law and that the entire law of Moses is abrogated in the life of the believer. Therefore, only the commandments of Christ and His Apostles are binding on the believer. In other words, this position does not equate the Ten Commandments with the immutable, absolute moral law of God.

    What evidence do we have that demonstrates that the Ten Commandments are that absolute moral law of God; therefore, binding on all people everywhere for all time"

    I know that Jesus fulfilled all of the moral/ceremonial/civil law in order to be our savior, but the part about the commandments of Christ and His Apostles seemed, well, a little strange, because they were 'bringing forth' the 10 commandments, so to speak, and debunking the 613 commandments of the Pharisee's.

    There's a Reformed Baptist church in my area, and I'm going to be checking them out. I'll have to ask about this NCT, because it doesn't seem to be Biblical as it is worded. ie, only the commandments of Christ and His Apostles, and I would ask what 'binding' means (as in a guide for believers, or we have to follow these or we're not saved)

    Thanks y'all - Grymir
     
  24. Reformed Covenanter

    Reformed Covenanter Puritan Board Doctor

    So they would hold to a more Continental* view of the Sabbath rather than a Scottish/Puritan view?

    * Yes, I know this is not entirely accurate terminology, but I use it for handiness.
     
  25. TaylorOtwell

    TaylorOtwell Puritan Board Junior

    I read the A.W. Pink article on the Sabbath, and the point that was most convincing at first was the reference to Genesis 16 and the observance of the Sabbath before Sinai in that passage.

    However, Noah also was to distinguish between clean and unclean animals before Sinai; therefore, according to Pink's logic, are we to continue to distinguish between clean and unclean animals?
     
  26. greenbaggins

    greenbaggins Administrator Staff Member

    I have written a longish sort of article on it here defending the Christian Sabbath as being Sunday from a redemptive historical point of view.
     
  27. A5pointer

    A5pointer Puritan Board Sophomore


    I am not seeing that in Genesis 16, what am I missing?
     
  28. Puritan Sailor

    Puritan Sailor Puritan Board Doctor

    Exodus 16
     
  29. TaylorOtwell

    TaylorOtwell Puritan Board Junior

    Sorry, Exodus 16. Thanks for the correction. :)
     
  30. Rev. Todd Ruddell

    Rev. Todd Ruddell Puritan Board Junior

    The Apostle John calls the day the Lord revealed to him his last book "The Lord's Day". (Rev. 1.10) Also, Christ, speaking of days after His resurrection (in other words New Testament Days) says to His disciples, "Pray that your flight be not on the Sabbath Day" (Matthew 24.20) In this the Lord places His special propriety on that day, calling it His own, and hearkening back to Isaiah 58.13-14:

    If thou turn away thy foot from the sabbath, from doing thy pleasure on my holy day; and call the sabbath a delight, the holy of the LORD, honourable; and shalt honour him, not doing thine own ways, nor finding thine own pleasure, nor speaking thine own words: 14 Then shalt thou delight thyself in the LORD; and I will cause thee to ride upon the high places of the earth, and feed thee with the heritage of Jacob thy father: for the mouth of the LORD hath spoken it.

    This passage is full of moral, not ceremonial requirements. It is the "Sabbath" or rest, of the Lord Thy God, in the NT as well as the OT. While it may be true that the command to remember the Sabbath Day is not *explicit* in the NT, it most certainly is *implicit* there as well. I note one other Scripture: In Acts 20, the Apostle Paul arrives at Troas, and we are told he stayed there 7 days. Of that seven days, we have an inspired record only of one, the first day of the week (The Christian Sabbath) when the Disciples came together to break bread (observe the sacrament) and Paul preached. Now, whether Paul preached on other days is not known, but a special note is made of the first day of the week, when the disciples came together for the purpose of breaking bread, and Paul preached--that we *do* know. This, with the other references and practices of Christ and the Disciples, form a strong inferential case for the New Testament Sabbath. And, seeing that we do not bifurcate the Scriptures into two separate books (OT, and NT) this is all that we would expect.
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2008
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