Hello, Former Lutheran Pastor Here

Status
Not open for further replies.

TheologiaCrucis

Puritan Board Freshman
Hello!

For 7 years I was a pastor in the LCMS. For a variety of reasons I chose to leave the denomination and grew intrigued by Puritan thought after an oddly occasioned study on John Eliot the "Apostle to the Gentiles." That said, in my PhD work in Lutheranism I became drawn to the Melanchthonian positions as opposed to the Gnesio position which prevailed in post-Luther Lutheranism. This position, at least on the points I found persuasive, was much aligned with Reformed positions.

My PhD dissertation deals with Luther and his theology of the human body.
 

reaganmarsh

Puritan Board Senior
Welcome to the PB! This is a great place to grow in the Lord and to fellowship with likeminded folks.

Grace to you.
 

TheologiaCrucis

Puritan Board Freshman
Welcome! (Did your paper deal with Luther and the imago dei?)
Welcome! (Did your paper deal with Luther and the imago dei?)
It isn't the primary theme--but I address it. In short, Luther is not consistent in his interpretation of what the "image of God" entails. He is somewhat uncommitted to what the "image of God" actually is--but as he reveals in his Genesis lectures given during the last decade of his life, his concern is to address the concept of the image of God as it is defined by Augustine in On the Trinity. Here, Augustine identifies the imago Dei with man's mind, memory and will. Luther says that man has "lost" the image of God while keeping this definition in view--ultimatley, his reason is consistent with his theology in the Bondage of the Will. He also links it with the manner of life that Adam and Eve enjoy in the garden, the manner of life, as Luther imagines God telling Adam and Eve, "This is my image, by which you are living, just as God lives. But if you sin, you will lose this image and you will die." Now, I don't agree entirely with Luther's definition of the imago Dei here... elsewhere he seems to define it differently, with different conclusions resulting from different defintiions... but it's important to recognize that what Luther *means* by his understanding of "Image of God" is not proper to man's essence, it is rather a component of man's relationship with God which, he affirms, is totally broken. So, if one were to accept Luther's understanding of the image of God, it would be consistent with the Reformed position on total depravity. The problem with Luther's view isn't so much with his assertion that the image of God is lost, but how he defines it to begin with.
 

Ray

Puritan Board Freshman
Hello!

For 7 years I was a pastor in the LCMS. For a variety of reasons I chose to leave the denomination and grew intrigued by Puritan thought after an oddly occasioned study on John Eliot the "Apostle to the Gentiles." That said, in my PhD work in Lutheranism I became drawn to the Melanchthonian positions as opposed to the Gnesio position which prevailed in post-Luther Lutheranism. This position, at least on the points I found persuasive, was much aligned with Reformed positions.

My PhD dissertation deals with Luther and his theology of the human body.
Welcome Glad your Here.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top