Has anyone read Pierre Courthial's A New Day of Small Beginnings?

Regi Addictissimus

Completely sold out to the King
Has anyone read Pierre Courthial's A New Day of Small Beginnings? A brother gave me a copy last year. I forgot about it until I stumbled across it last night. I am not overly familiar with Courthial or much less the book. My friend was raving about it.
I have much respect for Douglass Kelly. Kelly wrote the following: "I will put myself on the line to say that this book should prove to be a highly significant book in the Church for the next 50 years." There are some other really positive endorsements, as with most endorsements. Can anyone that has read it provide me with your thoughts, criticisms, and commendations?

For those not familiar with the book in question, check it out through this link:
http://bit.ly/Courthial
 

Stephen L Smith

Moderator
Staff member
Robert, on the basis of the reviews I purchased this book and have started reading it. I am not far into the book but what I have read has been very insightful.
I have much respect for Douglass Kelly. Kelly wrote the following: "I will put myself on the line to say that this book should prove to be a highly significant book in the Church for the next 50 years."
Kelly wrote an insightful 12 page foreword to the book and gives multiple reasons why one should read it. Courthial documents the impact of humanism on Western law but is optimistic for the future based on the promises of God Habakkuk 2:14. He emphasises its importance to the church. He does say that Courthial's section on the penal law does appear to go much further than Calvin and most of the Reformers have gone, but this should not detract from the importance of the work.

I can say as I consider the moral decadence in my own country, no doubt it is a timely book. The translator had an interesting interview with Pierre Courthial in his apartment in Paris in 2006. Courthial said that nothing but judgment remains for his native France, but he was optimistic about the future based on Hab 2:14.
 

arapahoepark

Puritan Board Graduate
I have it. I went through most of it, however, in many ways he is trying to make a case for Theonomy in the end. Its a concise church history of sorts centered around particular 'battles' from creation through modern day. The most current conflict in both the secular and church realm that he finds, in his opinion, is the binding nature of moral and judicial laws.
 
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