Francis Turretin Elenctic Theology + Greek New Testament Commentary

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Qin

Puritan Board Freshman
Dear all,
I wonder if anyone has free access to Francis Turretin's Elenctic Theology?
There is no kindle version on Amazon. I won't be able to purchase the hard copy from where I am.

Will you recommend his book for systematic theology study or any of the following authors?
Reasons?

lewis sperry chafer
wayne grudem
John frame
herman bavinck
.......
http://www.puritanboard.com/showthread.php/90475-Pruning-Library
I do not have access to a page a brother graciously pointed to in a previous post somehow.

Also, any recommendations for Greek new testament commentary?

I would appreciate your input.
 

johnny

Puritan Board Sophomore
Dear all,
I wonder if anyone has free access to Francis Turretin's Elenctic Theology?
There is no kindle version on Amazon. I won't be able to purchase the hard copy from where I am.

Its available on Logos but it will cost you.

https://www.logos.com/product/30296/institutes-of-elenctic-theology

I missed the pre pubs on this but I'm buying it for my birthday in november as a present to myself. :)

Bavinck's Reformed Dogmatics is on Logos too but its even more expensive.
Luckily it was in the Reformed Portfolio bundle that I brought because the price is killer.

https://www.logos.com/product/5309/reformed-dogmatics

As for Frame, I personally like reading his work as he sets things out clearly for dummies like myself.
I have read he has some "issues" and there are threads on PB regarding these (I still like him)
 

TylerRay

Puritan Board Graduate
Qin,

I would discourage you from using all of the authors you mentioned except for Turretin and Bavinck. Chafer is a dispensationalist, Grudem is a charismatic, and Frame has too many peculiarities to list here. Let's just say that, while Frame is a Calvinist and a Presbyterian, he takes issue with a large number of parts of the Reformed Confessions.

If you are looking for something free on the internet, you should consider Calvin's Institutes or Hodge's Systematic Theology.
 

arapahoepark

Puritan Board Post-Graduate
Qin,

I would discourage you from using all of the authors you mentioned except for Turretin and Bavinck. Chafer is a dispensationalist, Grudem is a charismatic, and Frame has too many peculiarities to list here. Let's just say that, while Frame is a Calvinist and a Presbyterian, he takes issue with a large number of parts of the Reformed Confessions.

If you are looking for something free on the internet, you should consider Calvin's Institutes or Hodge's Systematic Theology.

I concur.
 

Ask Mr. Religion

Flatly Unflappable
Qin,

I would discourage you from using all of the authors you mentioned except for Turretin and Bavinck. Chafer is a dispensationalist, Grudem is a charismatic, and Frame has too many peculiarities to list here. Let's just say that, while Frame is a Calvinist and a Presbyterian, he takes issue with a large number of parts of the Reformed Confessions.

If you are looking for something free on the internet, you should consider Calvin's Institutes or Hodge's Systematic Theology.
Indeed.
 

reaganmarsh

Puritan Board Senior
Qin,

I would discourage you from using all of the authors you mentioned except for Turretin and Bavinck. Chafer is a dispensationalist, Grudem is a charismatic, and Frame has too many peculiarities to list here. Let's just say that, while Frame is a Calvinist and a Presbyterian, he takes issue with a large number of parts of the Reformed Confessions.

If you are looking for something free on the internet, you should consider Calvin's Institutes or Hodge's Systematic Theology.
Indeed.

Let me add my vote and "fourth" that...
 

psycheives

Puritan Board Freshman
Qin,

I would discourage you from using all of the authors you mentioned except for Turretin and Bavinck. Chafer is a dispensationalist, Grudem is a charismatic, and Frame has too many peculiarities to list here. Let's just say that, while Frame is a Calvinist and a Presbyterian, he takes issue with a large number of parts of the Reformed Confessions.

If you are looking for something free on the internet, you should consider Calvin's Institutes or Hodge's Systematic Theology.

Ditto 7 times.

Also you can get Louis Berkhof's well-respected Systematic Theology online for free at a couple sites. Here is one version: https://www.monergism.com/thethreshold/sdg/berkhof/systematic_theology.html


The "top 5" most respected Reformed Systematic Theologies almost always include these guys (in no order):
Calvin - always
Turretin - always
Bavinck - always
Berkhof - often
John Brown of Haddington - often
Robert Reymond - often
Robert Louis Dabney - often
Wilhelm a Brakel - sometimes because people forget him but held in very high esteem
WGT Shedd - sometimes
Charles Hodge - sometimes

lewis sperry chafer - Too many errors to list: old school Classical Dispensationalism (dangerous); Classical Dispensational is full of errors and strange claims; Dangerous unbiblical contrast between Old and New Testaments; Accused of teaching a false Law/Gospel distinction that leads to antinomianism (see MacArthur's critiques); Divorcing Christ and his benefits leads implicitly to "two views of salvation (including sanctification)" whether one wants to admit it or not; the list goes on. See OT Allis' and MacArthur's critiques.
wayne grudem - Taking heat for what many have been calling a "heretical" view of the Trinity (Has been teaching this for ~20 years) and Charismatic views
John frame - Strongly criticized for his recommendation and support of Norman Shepherd's work without ANY warning of discernment at all. Considering the controversy where Shepherd was outted at Westminster Theological Seminary at Philadelphia after given ~7 years to clarify and re-clarify his views, it is telling when someone quotes and recommends Shepherd without hesitation. Also criticized for his view of the Confessions and what many consider "too broad" of a definition of Reformed.
 

Mikey

Puritan Board Freshman
I would discourage you from using all of the authors you mentioned except for Turretin and Bavinck... Grudem is a charismatic, and Frame has too many peculiarities to list here.

With respect, I must certainly disagree! I am no continuationist like Grudem and I do not agree with Frame on every issue, but surely we can benefit from their systematic theologies and other works. Must we agree with everything an author produces in order to encourage others to read their works? Surely not! As a baptist, should I be discouraged to read Calvin simply because we have different views on baptism? No! There is nothing wrong with reading (or endorsing) someone who you disagree with on some (relatively minor) issues, or else we couldn't in good conscience read anything but our own theological works (and I haven't ever written anything, so that would be a bummer). Grudem? His systematic theology is a gold mine. Frame? His systematic theology is insightful and fresh in its approach. Just like Grudem and Frame, God has raised up many men from many denominations and schools of thought to equip and edify the church. We must all ask ourselves: shall we be so quick to divide the church unnecessarily? Surely we can have unity in the midst of diversity (given, of course, the core principles of the faith are not compromised). Thus, with all respect, I must disagree with the quote and say that although Grudem and Frame are only fallible men, they have much to teach us in their works.
 

TylerRay

Puritan Board Graduate
I would discourage you from using all of the authors you mentioned except for Turretin and Bavinck... Grudem is a charismatic, and Frame has too many peculiarities to list here.

With respect, I must certainly disagree! I am no continuationist like Grudem and I do not agree with Frame on every issue, but surely we can benefit from their systematic theologies and other works. Must we agree with everything an author produces in order to encourage others to read their works? Surely not! As a baptist, should I be discouraged to read Calvin simply because we have different views on baptism? No! There is nothing wrong with reading (or endorsing) someone who you disagree with on some (relatively minor) issues, or else we couldn't in good conscience read anything but our own theological works (and I haven't ever written anything, so that would be a bummer). Grudem? His systematic theology is a gold mine. Frame? His systematic theology is insightful and fresh in its approach. Just like Grudem and Frame, God has raised up many men from many denominations and schools of thought to equip and edify the church. We must all ask ourselves: shall we be so quick to divide the church unnecessarily? Surely we can have unity in the midst of diversity (given, of course, the core principles of the faith are not compromised). Thus, with all respect, I must disagree with the quote and say that although Grudem and Frame are only fallible men, they have much to teach us in their works.

Mikey, I would never assert that someone should never read these men. However, I would discourage someone from beginning their study of systematic theology with them. They'll point folks in the wrong direction. Frame is a paedocommunionist, defends the use of images of Christ, denies (or radically redefines) the regulative principle of worship, and, worst of all, is a Shepherdite. How, then, can I recommend him to someone beginning studies in systematics?
 
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