Found Some Beautiful Fonts

Taylor Sexton

Puritan Board Junior
I am a big fan of old fonts. Today I discovered this website by an Italian man who in the past ten years has revived types designed by one John Fell (1625-1686) of Oxford University Press back in the seventeenth century. They are thus named "The Fell Types."

Here is a sample of one of his fonts:

1593309603428.png

What other fonts do you all find to be particularly beautiful?
 

JM

Puritan Board Doctor
I have used Fell style in ad's for work. Very pleasing to the eye but I guess it's difficult for people with dyslexia so I can only use it once in a while.
 

NaphtaliPress

Administrator
Staff member
I discovered these last year and they made the design for the Naphtali Press Special Editions Series, in a limited way, not as the main text. Mainly the boarders and manicules. If you use his fonts professionally, all he asks is you note his authorship (Igino Marini), which I do on the copyright pages.
 
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W.C. Dean

Puritan Board Freshman
Times New Roman is what I have used for everything except this forum. I am using it now though. I do not particularly love it but it is not bad. I wish I had better fonts. I like the ones you demonstrated.
 

bookslover

Puritan Board Doctor
I discovered these last year and they made the design for the Naphtali Press Special Editions Series, in a limited way, not as the main text. Mainly the boarders and manicules. If you use his fonts professional all he asks is you note his authorship (Igino Marini), which I do on the copyright pages.
Chris, what is the difference between a font and a typeface? Or are the two terms interchangeable?
 

NaphtaliPress

Administrator
Staff member
When I say I use them minimally that doesn't mean not prominent. They are on the jacket and title page for instance (he has characters from which you make various old type boarders). The text faces are just a bit to more than a bit too rough. I stuck with my standard since 2013, Adobe Sabon Next Pro.
1593346326278.png
I discovered these last year and they made the design for the Naphtali Press Special Editions Series, in a limited way, not as the main text. Mainly the boarders and manicules. If you use his fonts professionally, all he asks is you note his authorship (Igino Marini), which I do on the copyright pages.
 

Pilgrim

Puritan Board Doctor
I'm not aware of any nuances;t I use them as interchangeable.
Would the font be the size (12 pt or whatever) and the typeface be Arial, Brevier, etc? Or is that antiquated, going back to the old "hot press" days? Or am I just barking up the wrong tree? I think they may be more or less interchangeable now, but perhaps they weren't in the past?
 

NaphtaliPress

Administrator
Staff member
Would the font be the size (12 pt or whatever) and the typeface be Arial, Brevier, etc? Or is that antiquated, going back to the old "hot press" days? Or am I just barking up the wrong tree? I think they may be more or less interchangeable now, but perhaps they weren't in the past?
I do not know.
 

Pilgrim

Puritan Board Doctor
I do not know.
For what it's worth, I've got one of the newer NKJVs with the "Comfort Print," which is what Harper Collins is using now. (Whatever else you want to say about them, their quality has really improved recently, at least for now.) On the copyright page, it reads "This Bible was set in the Thomas Nelson NKJV Typeface, created at the 2K/DENMARK type foundry." Another version by another publisher "was designed and typeset using Bible Serif," also created by 2K/DENMARK, which seems to be the go-to these days.
 

NaphtaliPress

Administrator
Staff member
I've got one of the newer NKJVs with the "Comfort Print," which is what Harper Collins is using now. On the copyright page, it reads "This Bible was set in the Thomas Nelson NKJV Typeface, created at the 2K/DENMARK type foundry." 2K/DENMARK
They chose typeface; I'm not sure it means anything beyond they chose that over type font but I'm open to learn.
 

Pilgrim

Puritan Board Doctor
They chose typeface; I'm not sure it means anything beyond they chose that over type font but I'm open to learn.
I think some of the people in the "Bible Geek" groups I'm in would have an opinion. I remember a discussion about it a while back, maybe a few years ago. I think there was a clearer distinction (or understanding) in the days of manual typesetting.

Here is some basic information from wiki articles on typeface and font. Perhaps it helps a little, but I wouldn't be surprised to find it contradicted somewhere else.

In metal typesetting, a font was a particular size, weight and style of a typeface. Each font was a matched set of type, one piece (called a "sort") for each glyph, and a typeface consisting of a range of fonts that shared an overall design.

In modern usage, with the advent of digital typography, "font" is frequently synonymous with "typeface". Each style is in a separate "font file"—for instance, the typeface "Bulmer" may include the fonts "Bulmer roman", "Bulmer", "Bulmer bold" and "Bulmer extended"—but the term "font" might be applied either to one of these alone or to the whole typeface.

In both traditional typesetting and modern usage, the word "font" refers to the delivery mechanism of the typeface design. In traditional typesetting, the font would be made from metal or wood. Today, the font is a digital file.
The distinction between font and typeface is that a font designates a specific member of a type family such as roman, boldface, or italic type, while typeface designates a consistent visual appearance or style which can be a "family" or related set of fonts. For example, a given typeface such as Arial may include roman, bold, and italic fonts.[2] In the metal type era, a font also meant a specific point size, but with digital scalable outline fonts this distinction is no longer valid, as a single font may be scaled to any size.
 

Edward

Puritanboard Commissioner
Here is a sample of one of his fonts:
Attractive, but not the most readable. Chris has the right approach. Use them appropriately for an attractive product, but not for the main text type.

@NaphtaliPress since I'm talking about you.

As for typeface/font - it's been a number of decades, but my recollection is typeface is the style, font is a matching subset of that style (usually based on size).
Now, that isn't how font is used on modern word processing programs - they generally call the typefaces fonts, and then refer to the fonts as the sizes. Thus, confusion for those who have never seen (or heard) a Linotype or Harris Intertype machine in action.
 

NaphtaliPress

Administrator
Staff member
Now, that isn't how font is used on modern word processing programs - they generally call the typefaces fonts, and then refer to the fonts as the sizes. Thus, confusion for those who have never seen (or heard) a Linotype or Harris Intertype machine in action.
Thanks. I never saw one in action that is for sure. Linotype put my great grandfather out of the hand typeset business. He worked for several newspapers late 19th century to the 1930s (died 1932 I think). He took part in the last fast typesetting contest and won, thus his title as world's fastest typesetter has never officially been broken. My first productions where photographic typeset and hardcoded for spacing, italics etc. That was to quickly die as PC software developed. I "chose poorly" as I settled on Ventura and PC. I switched in Adobe InDesign around 2003 as I developed the journal project that would become The Confessional Presbyterian journal. I don't regret not going Mac because Adobe dropped support for InDesign and so, what's the point? Plus, I am not an Apple fan.
 

Simon Padbury

Puritan Board Freshman
Hi

(This is my first post on Puritanboard)

Typeface EB Garamond is good for use on websites where you want an older feel. Maybe pair it as the main text while using one of the Fell Types for headings.

Cardo is also good, especially if you need Roman, Greek and/or Hebrew.
 

NaphtaliPress

Administrator
Staff member
Hi

(This is my first post on Puritanboard)

Typeface EB Garamond is good for use on websites where you want an older feel. Maybe pair it as the main text while using one of the Fell Types for headings.

Cardo is also good, especially if you need Roman, Greek and/or Hebrew.
Thank you for your first post. You've been a member since 2011 or I'd say welcome too. :) Please fix your signature per the board rules; see the link below under Useful links.
 

Simon Padbury

Puritan Board Freshman
Thank you for your first post. You've been a member since 2011 or I'd say welcome too. :) Please fix your signature per the board rules; see the link below under Useful links.
Hi Chris, Thanks, yes I joined many years ago and then forgot all about Puritanboard. I maybe wrong but I don't think I posted before this. I've added a photo - what else needs fixing on my signature?
 

NaphtaliPress

Administrator
Staff member
Hi Chris, Thanks, yes I joined many years ago and then forgot all about Puritanboard. I maybe wrong but I don't think I posted before this. I've added a photo - what else needs fixing on my signature?
Just add a simple signature. The instructions are here: https://www.puritanboard.com/help/signature/ to get to your signature click on your username upper right and click on signature in the dropdown box.
 

JTB.SDG

Puritan Board Sophomore
I've been a big fan of Baskerville Old Face the last several years. It's basically the only font I use. Sometimes I mix it up with Papyrus for titles.
 
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Spurgeonite

Puritan Board Freshman
Anyone have any idea what font is used by Ligonier often, ie. Table Talk Magazine and their bibles? I love it for some reason
 
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