Evangelizing Moderate Muslims

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kalawine

Puritan Board Junior
I've won the confidence of a couple of moderate Muslims in our community. We've had some brief discussions on our religious differences. All they want to do is assure me that we are all "going to the same place." I've been trying to gently persuade them that this relative, postmodern view of religion makes no sense. I've also told them that Christianity doesn't allow for such a view because Jesus has told us that he is the only way. So far they don't seem to be terribly disturbed by what I'm saying but they also don't quite seem to "get it." Does anyone on the board know how to go about evangelizing them? This is all new to me. (Also, please pray for the Holy Spirit to regenerate them and reveal Jesus to them :pray2:)
 

Solus Christus

Puritan Board Sophomore
Seeing as they are moderate Muslims (more than likely ignorant of the Koran and religion as a whole) I would imagine that you evangelize to them as you would to any other unbeliever. But just keep this in mind:

Have no fear of them, nor be troubled, but in your hearts honor Christ the Lord as holy, always being prepared to make a defense to anyone who asks you for a reason for the hope that is in you; yet do it with gentleness and respect, having a good conscience, so that, when you are slandered, those who revile your good behavior in Christ may be put to shame. (1Pet3:14a-16 ESV)

:pray2:ing for you brother that this experience may edify you and glorify our Lord.
 

Pergamum

Ordinary Guy (TM)
Show them love and pray personally for them (even in their presence) if they have problems. Many are very touched by personal prayer (have had people literally break down crying).

Show them Matthew 11:28 - for some reason God particularly uses this verse to bless Muslims.



Where are they from? Are they Middle Eastern or SouthEast Asian Muslim?



A survey of certain SE Asian Muslims showed that apologetics and preaching were NOT the main reasons for coming to faith (in their testimony) but the example and care of others who identified themselves as "Christian." In short, they appear to have been "Loved into the kingdom" and due to the love they saw they seriously considered the claims that Jesus was more than a prophet.



Others advocate the "Camel Method" (google might work) which uses the Qur'an itself as a bridge and a jumping off point for discussion.
 

kalawine

Puritan Board Junior
Show them love and pray personally for them (even in their presence) if they have problems. Many are very touched by personal prayer (have had people literally break down crying).

Show them Matthew 11:28 - for some reason God particularly uses this verse to bless Muslims.



Where are they from? Are they Middle Eastern or SouthEast Asian Muslim?



A survey of certain SE Asian Muslims showed that apologetics and preaching were NOT the main reasons for coming to faith (in their testimony) but the example and care of others who identified themselves as "Christian." In short, they appear to have been "Loved into the kingdom" and due to the love they saw they seriously considered the claims that Jesus was more than a prophet.



Others advocate the "Camel Method" (google might work) which uses the Qur'an itself as a bridge and a jumping off point for discussion.

Thanks so much for the info! These guys are from Egypt.
 

CovenantalBaptist

Puritan Board Freshman
First a note of caution: I did a GIS for "the Camel method" and came up with this critique which gave me some pause. I think we need to be careful to distinguish the Gospel from the Qur'an and Yahweh God from Allah. I also think that it is a bit worrisome that it uses the Qur'an as its main basis. 1) Muslims discredit any non-Arabic English translation (they even call them interpretations - it's sort of like we view liberal translations of the Bible like the RSV, the JW translation only much worse). I'm not saying don't use them, but I would say that you are better on the firmer ground of Scripture which has the power to divide joints and sinew 2) You are ultimately trying to point them to *the* "book" that Islam at points actually affirms passages in the NT cf. Surah 5:46, 67,69,71. The Qur'an both alleges the corruption of the Holy Scriptures (Surah 5:14-15), but, importantly also affirms it (contradictions are rife in the Qur'an):
Surah 10:94: “If thou wert in doubt as to what We have revealed unto thee, then ask those who have been reading the Book from before thee: the Truth hath indeed come to thee from thy Lord: so be in no wise of those in doubt.” These people of the book include us Christians as well as Jews.

I had the privilege at a GPTS conference to hear Anees Zaka who has a ministry to Muslims and approaches it mostly from a Reformed/Van Tillian approach (he is Egyptian himself and a Reformed Presbyterian who runs a ministry of witness to Muslims). He lectures at both WTS and GPTS. I recommend his two main books. I have read "Truth About Islam" and parts of "Christians and Muslims at the Table". You can see all of his books here

I think Pergamum is absolutely right to affirm Matthew 11:28. Islam is a law oriented religion with only a transcendent deity (unlike the transcendent/imminent Yahweh). In that way it is a neo-Pharisaism complete with its own strict and unobtainable laws. There are, however, wondrous opportunities to talk about the Gospel as they have already have a (false) concept of Christology. Interestingly, they believe that Allah would not allow the sacrifice of Jesus on the cross and yet one of their central feasts is that of Ede (this year it is at the end of September it celebrates the end of Ramadan and the sacrifice of Ishmael (they get the whole Isaac/Ishmael thing very confused).

But, I also think Pergamum's statement about personal prayer and practical love are vital. The theological arguments must be buttressed by the practical expression of the Gospel.

May God bless your efforts to proclaim the Gospel.

There are other resources if you would like them, I did a paper on Islamic Christology/Soteriology in seminary. I wouldn't recommend that, but my sources were much better and I'd be happy to share some of the bibliography if it would help :)
 

Pergamum

Ordinary Guy (TM)
I have read the Qur'an 7 times. I have done the Ramadan fast (without the Takbiran and other ritual stuff).

If you were to read the Qur'an chronologically it would help to see the development of the religion from a meek minority religion preaching morality to a theocractic religion of the sword when in the majority. Also, if you were to read the Qur'an (shorter than the NT by far) than I usually tell others that I have read the Qur'an, why don't they read about Isa now...and some are receptive to this.

(although if these are casual acquaintances only, don't waste your time with dreck)....
 
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