ESV Large-Print Pew Bible

Status
Not open for further replies.

bookslover

Puritan Board Doctor
On some past thread regarding the sturdiness (or lack thereof) of American-made Bibles, a couple of folks said that they own personal copies of pew Bibles, since they are built to last. They also noted that pew Bibles have the advantage of being "just the text" - no distracting notes or other paraphernalia to get in the way.

I pondered getting one but, for whatever reason, didn't do it. Then, today, I saw in a Christian bookstore that the ESV folks have put out a large-print pew Bible. The print is 12.75-point type, the verse numbers are in very dark type (a good thing) and the Bibles are hard-bound (natch, being intended for years of church wear and tear). They come in black, blue, and red. The words of Christ are in black (another good thing). And, they're only $21.95.

I bought one. I finally found a sturdy Bible with big enough print for my almost 55-year-old eyes. Now if it only came with each verse starting on its own line (instead of paragraphing), I'd really be set!
 

tellville

Puritan Board Junior
Now if it only came with each verse starting on its own line (instead of paragraphing), I'd really be set!

Why do people prefer this method? Is it because paragraphing can involve too much interpretation on the translators? I'm just curious.
 

bookslover

Puritan Board Doctor
Now if it only came with each verse starting on its own line (instead of paragraphing), I'd really be set!

Why do people prefer this method? Is it because paragraphing can involve too much interpretation on the translators? I'm just curious.

In my case, I teach adult Sunday School on a fairly regular basis, and having each verse begin on its own line just makes it easier to find a verse I want while teaching without having to find one buried in the middle of a paragraph. I also believe that separating out the verses helps us to not miss things, helps us to pay closer attention to the text of Scripture.
 

jbergsing

Puritan Board Sophomore
Now if it only came with each verse starting on its own line (instead of paragraphing), I'd really be set!
I've yet to find an ESV formatted without the paragraphs. Paragraphing, In my humble opinion, leads to too much interpretation by the translators. Interesting idea about the pew bibles. I'm looking at getting my two oldest kids bibles and, considering their durability, this might be the answer!
 

Greg

Puritan Board Sophomore
I'm partial to the paragraph format. It seems to be more how each Epistle was presented to its original audience as it was a letter to a particular church.

But Richard's point about making it easier to locate specific verses is a good one.
 

bookslover

Puritan Board Doctor
I've yet to find an ESV formatted without the paragraphs.

The ESV Single Column Reference Bible is laid out with each verse beginning on its own line. Verse by verse, not paragraph by paragraph. Poetry is still laid out as poetry. I like it, but it's huge because extra margin space is also provided. It's like carrying a boulder into church.

But that's just me...
 

bookslover

Puritan Board Doctor
I'm partial to the paragraph format. It seems to be more how each Epistle was presented to its original audience as it was a letter to a particular church.

Actually, the ancient Greek manuscripts were just blocks of text. If you saw an ancient manuscript of, say, Romans, you'd see no paragraph divisions, verse numbers, or chapter divisions. In fact, no punctuation! Romans would be just one long block of solid text. Not even any spaces between the words.
 

Greg

Puritan Board Sophomore
I'm partial to the paragraph format. It seems to be more how each Epistle was presented to its original audience as it was a letter to a particular church.

Actually, the ancient Greek manuscripts were just blocks of text. If you saw an ancient manuscript of, say, Romans, you'd see no paragraph divisions, verse numbers, or chapter divisions. In fact, no punctuation! Romans would be just one long block of solid text. Not even any spaces between the words.

GOODPOINTYESYOUARECORRECTINFACTWASNTEVERYTHINGWRITTENINCAPITALLEETERSTOOGOODTHINGWEDONTWRITELIKETHATNOWESPECIALLYFORSOMEONEWHOISLONGWINDEDANDDOESNTKNOWWHENTOSTOPTHEYKEEPGOINGANDGOINGANDGOINGANDGOING...:D
 

Robert Truelove

Puritan Board Sophomore
When I first went over to the ESV from the KJV as my 'standard', I didn't like the paragraph format. After I got used to it, I find I rather like it.

The KJV is no more or less interpretative in this manner because it has the paragraph marks, even if the verses are line by line.

If I were the 'Pope of Protestantism' :graduate: , I'd have the official translation be the ESV & KJV combined. The ESV for the history and epistles and the KJV as is for the poetry, especially the Psalms.



Now if it only came with each verse starting on its own line (instead of paragraphing), I'd really be set!

Why do people prefer this method? Is it because paragraphing can involve too much interpretation on the translators? I'm just curious.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top