Domestic Bliss

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Eoghan

Puritan Board Senior
My wife likes to try different recipes not all of which are resounding success. Tonight I had a chicken in a dark brown gravy sauce. I thought it was a little too gamey and salty. I considered what to say and contemplated
A. Saying chicken was best served with a white wine based sauce with citrus notes and a light
touch of herbs - this was a red wine based meaty sauce ...

B. Keeping quiet

C. Saying it was a unique experience which could not (should not) be repeated
 

Eoghan

Puritan Board Senior
I went with A and was greeted with "Well I really enjoyed it and fancied something different. I should do an Aonghas on you and cook my meal separately and give you a frozen dinner" followed by "I won't ask you again"

I think tactful ways of encouraging domestic harmony should be a forum in it's own right.
 

Ask Mr. Religion

Flatly Unflappable
I have been doing all the cooking at home for the past fifteen years or so.

My first rule is no negative commentary about the food unless I comment first, signaling feedback is ok. Absent the first rule, the second rule is that comments about the meal are fine once a day has passed. I do not like negative feedback while still in the throes of preparing and serving a meal. It is just too deflating. ;)
 

SolaScriptura

Puritanboard Snowflake
My wife engages in a lot of recipe experimentation. Thankfully, she understands and appreciates the value of feedback in determining which recipes move from the "try once" column to the "repeat" column. Still, as a rule I never want to squelch a creative and eager culinary spirit - over nearly 22 years I've benefited so often from her gastronomical concoctions that I am happy to overlook the occasional misstep. It helps that she has (now) cooked long enough that I can chalk up any unpleasant dishes to the recipe itself rather than to her technique. So I'll say something like, "Thank you for this, babe..." and I'll give her a knowing glance and she'll say something like "So this is a "try once" dish?" To which I'll say, "Unless you really liked it..."
 

Edward

Puritanboard Commissioner
I'll usually suggest alterations to the recipe - more liquid next time, or less salt, or more paprika if the recipe turns out less than ideal. Since she follows recipes, subsequent efforts are usually better. (I, on the other hand, usually treat recipes as inspirations, not directions.) We generally agree on final results
 
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