Divine Right of G

Status
Not open for further replies.

Scott

Puritan Board Graduate
Has anyone read this book?

Edmund Calamy (1660-1666), _Jus divinum ministerii evangelici: or, The divine right of the gospel-ministry : divided
into two parts ... : together with an appendix, wherein the judgment and practice of antiquity about the whole matter of episcopacy, and especially about the ordination of ministers, is briefly discussed_ (1654).

Calamy was a Westminster divine. I am curious about what aspects of ordination it discusses.
 

Scott

Puritan Board Graduate
According to an advertisement one section deals with why the reformers did not need reordination. I would be interested to see the reasoning behind that. I may try and get this from interlibrary loan.
 

VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
Has this book been reprinted? I am aware that Still Waters has it. Their description follows:

As the full title intimates this book is divided into two major parts. The first part contains,

a justification of the Gospel ministry in general, the necessity of ordination thereunto by imposition of hands, the unlawfulness of private men assuming to themselves either the office or work of the ministry without a lawful call and ordination, etc. Part two covers "a justification of the present ministers of England, both such as were ordained during the prevalency of Episcopacy from the foul aspersion of antichristianism: and those who have been ordained since its abolition, from the unjust imputation of novelty: proving that a Bishop and Presbyter are all one in Scripture; and that ordination by Presbyters is most agreeable to the Scripture pattern. Together with an appendix, wherein the judgment and practice of antiquity about the whole matter of Episcopacy, and especially about the ordination of ministers, is briefly discussed.

Moreover, The Divine Right of the Gospel Ministry gives us a further glimpse of how different the old and faithful jus divinum of presbyterianism (taught by English representatives at the Westminster Assembly) is from our modern, so-called "presbyterianism."

[David] Hall notes, "So strongly were they committed to this thorough-going jus divinum view that they stated the following 'four things that justly deserve to be abhorred by all good Christians:

(1) An Universal Toleration of all Religions.

(2) An Universal Admittance of all men to the Lord's Supper.

(3) Universal Grace, that is, that Christ died equally for all, and that all men have free-will to be saved.

(4) Universal Allowance of all that suppose themselves gifted to preach without Ordination" (Introduction to the Naphtali edition, p. xxi).

Hall further states that

these ministers viewed their commitments to both of these jus divinum aspects (i.e. to the divine right of Presbyterian church government and the divine right of a Presbyterian Gospel ministry--RB) as to 'the seamless coat of Christ.' Throughout this second document, the authors speak in continuity with the earlier volume with the main error to be corrected, as stated as: 'That there is no such Office as the Office of the Ministry; or That this Office is quite lost; or That every man that thinks himself gifted, may intrude into the Ministerial Office. These opinions we judge destructive to Christian Religion, and an in-let to Popery and all error, to all disorder and confusion, and at last to all profaneness and Atheism (Ibid.).

In short, when the ministry is disparaged (and open to every heretic and schismatic who calls himself to this sacred task) the truth of Scripture will be trampled underfoot, the visible church (constitutionally) rent in pieces (by those denying a biblically covenanted uniformity), and the toleration of every foul error will become commonplace (sounds like today, doesn't it?).

This is an English Presbyterian classic written by some of the men who attended the Westminster Assembly. It is a companion volume to their earlier Divine Right of Church Government and should be studied in conjunction with this unsurpassed work. 351 pages.

I am also looking forward to reading Matthew Poole's Quo warranto, or, A moderate enquiry into the warrantablenesse of the preaching of gifted and unordained persons where also some other questions are discussed : viz. concerning [brace] ministerial relation, election, ordination : being a vindication of the late Jus divinum ministerii evangeliei ... from the exceptions of Mr. John Martin, Mr. Sam. Pette, Mr. Frederick Woodal ... in their late book, intituled The preacher sent (1658).
 

Scott

Puritan Board Graduate
I am pretty sure that Naphtali Press has reprinted it in a nice version (not a SWRB photocopy).
 

VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
Originally posted by Scott
I am pretty sure that Naphtali Press has reprinted it in a nice version (not a SWRB photocopy).

As far as I know, Naphtali Press only reprinted Jus Divinum Regiminis Ecclesiastici, not Jus Divinum Ministerii Evangelici.
 

NaphtaliPress

Administrator
Staff member
Scott,
NP just did Divine Right of Church Government. David Hall and I have talked about doing Divine Right of the Gospel Ministry over the years as a companion volume, but it would be a lot of work and I cannot afford another project where I wasn't supposed to be editing or even co-editing. David had based his text on a first edition he had bought. The final edition was the third edition with additions and redactions. So I ended up comparing the text to a 19th century edition based upon the third which accounts for the notations on the differences between the first and third editions in the NP volume (the most interesting is the omission of tithing as an ordinance of worship in the third edition).
Originally posted by Scott
I am pretty sure that Naphtali Press has reprinted it in a nice version (not a SWRB photocopy).
 

VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
Originally posted by VirginiaHuguenot
I am also looking forward to reading Matthew Poole's Quo warranto, or, A moderate enquiry into the warrantablenesse of the preaching of gifted and unordained persons where also some other questions are discussed : viz. concerning [brace] ministerial relation, election, ordination : being a vindication of the late Jus divinum ministerii evangeliei ... from the exceptions of Mr. John Martin, Mr. Sam. Pette, Mr. Frederick Woodal ... in their late book, intituled The preacher sent (1658).

I recently acquired Matthew Poole's Quo warranto. It appears to give a valuable historical context on the debates surrounding Jus Divinum Ministerii Evangelici.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top