De Moor on Creation

Theologians make a distinction between the "Primary Creation" and the "Secondary". What do they have in mind?

De Moor explains...

 
This world was fashioned by a Perfect Creator. But was the Creation itself Perfect? And, if not, how can we say that the Creator is Perfect?

De Moor explores...

 
Is there a rationale to the order of the creative acts of the six days?

De Moor explores this fascinating topic...

 
The ultimate purpose of the Creation is God's glory.

However, He also lovingly fashioned all things for Man's benefit and enjoyment.

De Moor contemplates this precious truth...

 
In all creation there is a marvelous and intricate balancing of cause and effect, means and ends, witnessing to the infinite Wisdom of God.

De Moor considers...

 
The created Universe is not eternal, but temporal; and time began with the creation of Matter.

De Moor here assails even the possibility of an Eternal Creation...

 
The next section on the age of the earth is quite lengthy. But I am getting close to the end...

In the meantime, De Moor's treatment of the Doctrine of Predestination is now available in print!

 
The next section on the age of the earth is quite lengthy. But I am getting close to the end...

In the meantime, De Moor's treatment of the Doctrine of Predestination is now available in print!


I am most interested in de Moor's Creation and I am saving up for that hardcover edition.

Thank you for all you do
 
I am most interested in de Moor's Creation and I am saving up for that hardcover edition.

Thank you for all you do
You're very kind. Thank you for the encouraging words.

Old Earth vs. Young Earth.

De Moor weighs in...

See Poole's comments on Chronology in the "Comments".

 
For the first time in English...

De Moor's extensive and detailed treatment of the Doctrine of Predestination is in print!

If you are interested in the theology of Dort, this is for you.

 
Formerly men studied the details of Scriptural interpretation the way that men now study the details of math and science.

Here, De Moor begins to digest the conversation concerning the season in which the world was created...

 
We are about half-way through De Moor's study on Creation.

This is what we have so far...

 
Having considered the date and season of the Creation of the World, De Moor now descends to the time of day.

The interest in detail is humbling.

 
Exceptional work you are doing, looking forward to when this is published in whole, hopefully as an ebook besides Hardcovers. May it have a ripple effect of more similar works being translated.

Your site is a blessing, i love everything there, the video on Christ in the OT was superb, played it for my dad, he being blessed as well.
 
Exceptional work you are doing, looking forward to when this is published in whole, hopefully as an ebook besides Hardcovers. May it have a ripple effect of more similar works being translated.

Your site is a blessing, i love everything there, the video on Christ in the OT was superb, played it for my dad, he being blessed as well.

It would be easy enough to copy-paste the posts and construct an ebook version for yourself. Donate whatever you prayerfully decide for his time and effort.

I am an old man and prefer the experience and reality of a physical copy so I am doomed to wait patiently like an astrophysicist for the next eclipse.

Hahaha
 
Are the seven days of the Creation week typico-prophetic of Seven Millennia of World History? or Seven Church-ages?

De Moor denies these ideas...

 
Do you know where the following may be found online in the broader context of De Moor's work(s)?

"It is objected that the justice of God will not admit the imputation of the sin of another. The answer is, in our author [Marck]: Justice will not, indeed, permit the imputation of the sin of another which is entirely and in every sense alien to him to whom it is imputed."

I found this quote of De Moor in Samuel Baird's The Elohim Revealed, pgs 505-507 (see the footnotes).
 
Do you know where the following may be found online in the broader context of De Moor's work(s)?

"It is objected that the justice of God will not admit the imputation of the sin of another. The answer is, in our author [Marck]: Justice will not, indeed, permit the imputation of the sin of another which is entirely and in every sense alien to him to whom it is imputed."

I found this quote of De Moor in Samuel Baird's The Elohim Revealed, pgs 505-507 (see the footnotes).
I don't know exactly, but I suspect that it is in his Commentarius in the locus on Original Sin. I have not yet gotten that far in the translation.
 
The next installment, coming next week, addresses many of the aberrant interpretations of the "six days".
 
Are the six days of Creation to be interpreted literally or figuratively?

De Moor defends a literal six days from the text!

 
Next installment: "In the beginning, God created the Heavens and the Earth..." Is this a summary of all that follows? or the first act of the first day? De Moor examines the issues.

Should have it ready in a few days...
 
The next piece, on the creation of the heavens and the earth, and of light, is lengthy and detailed. It is taking a little longer than anticipated, but should be ready in a few days...
 
"In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth." Is this a summary of Genesis 1? or is it the first creative act of the first day?

De Moor explores...

 
"Let there be light." There is something great and august about these words...

De Moor reflects upon their significance...

 
Coming soon: De Moor's treatment of the firmament/expanse is fascinating. Does the Hebrew term imply that it was/is solid? De Moor tackles this, and other issues concerning the Second Day of Creation.
 
The "firmament" must be, or have been, some sort of solid dome over the earth, right?

Not so fast, says De Moor...

 
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