Current shades of God’s response to the Tower of Babel?

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Wretched Man

Puritan Board Freshman
When looking at the progression of human history, it is startling to see the recent rapid and exponential clustering of people throughout the world via urbanization. It has reminded me of Nimrod’s attempt to concentrate all the people, only to be countered by God’s language division which spread the peoples apart from each other.

I’ve pondered if COVID-19 with all the social distancing, isolations, etc. is God’s response to urbanization in a similar vein to His original language barrier introduction?
 

jwright82

Puritan Board Graduate
When looking at the progression of human history, it is startling to see the recent rapid and exponential clustering of people throughout the world via urbanization. It has reminded me of Nimrod’s attempt to concentrate all the people, only to be countered by God’s language division which spread the peoples apart from each other.

I’ve pondered if COVID-19 with all the social distancing, isolations, etc. is God’s response to urbanization in a similar vein to His original language barrier introduction?
What's inherently wrong with urbanization? Also I think Nimrod's problem was deeper than that, open rebellion against God and all.
 

Jack K

Puritan Board Professor
Although I enjoy small-town life, I agree with Jamie. I'm not sure we should suggest that Scripture, overall, reveals God to be opposed to urbanization. Although one might get that sense from Genesis 11, later parts of the Bible seem to speak favorably of cities when they are godly, like Jerusalem. And despite beginning with a garden, the Bible ends with a city—the New Jerusalem. God's trajectory seems to be pro-city.
 

jwright82

Puritan Board Graduate
Also I just read that Josephus said that Nimrod built the tower so high so that God couldn't flood the people again and that he would avenge man against God. How accurate that is I leave to y'all to decide but it is interesting context on his motivation.
 

Wretched Man

Puritan Board Freshman
Also I just read that Josephus said that Nimrod built the tower so high so that God couldn't flood the people again and that he would avenge man against God. How accurate that is I leave to y'all to decide but it is interesting context on his motivation.
Interesting (and possibly true) context. I will admit I've always had a bias against cities and have presumed they were inherently wrong without much consideration. Yes, Nimrod's rebellion was deeper than simply building a city, though in reading Genesis 11, this appears to be the primary act that God disapproves of, which is in opposition to his command in Genesis 9:1.

I'm not sure we should suggest that Scripture, overall, reveals God to be opposed to urbanization. Although one might get that sense from Genesis 11, later parts of the Bible seem to speak favorably of cities when they are godly, like Jerusalem. And despite beginning with a garden, the Bible ends with a city—the New Jerusalem. God's trajectory seems to be pro-city.
To Jack's point, yes, we do have a heavenly city awaiting us and at times, God commanded his people to build or restores cities. But I'm not sure we should presume he is pro-city in this sinful and broken world.

Thinking off the cuff, here would be a few issues I have with urbanization, some of these being similar and inextricably linked:
  1. It facilitates greater governmental and societal control of lives, which inherently is corrupt and contrary to God's will.
  2. It develops a greater dependency people have on other (corrupt) people.
  3. It increases the general entertainment interests and busyness of people to distract them from God.
  4. It facilitates proliferation of sin among the ungodly.
  5. It exposes God's people to more temptations.
 
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