Conversations with Death

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JM

Puritan Board Doctor
Some old school music with a tad bit of Bible and history thrown in.

But God will redeem my soul from the power of the grave: for he shall receive me. Selah. Psalm 49.15

“O Death, also known as O, Death, Oh Death and Conversations with Death, is a traditional American folk song. In 2004, the Journal of Folklore Research asserted that “O, Death” is Lloyd Chandler’s song “A Conversation with Death”, which Chandler performed in the 1920s while preaching in Appalachia.” – Wiki

Lyrics:

Oh death, oh death
Won’t you spare me over til another year

Well what is this that I can’t see With ice cold hands taking hold of me
Well I am death none can excel I’ll open the door to heaven or hell

Whoa death someone would pray Could you wait to call me til another day
The children pray the preacher preached Time and mercy is out of your reach

I’ll fix your feet til you can’t walk I’ll lock your jaw til you can’t talk
I’ll close your eyes so you can’t see This very hour come and go with me

In death I come to take the soul Leave the body and leave it cold
To drop the flesh off of the frame The earth and worms both have a claim

Oh death, oh death
Won’t you spare me over til another year

My mother came to my bed Place a cold towel upon my head
My head is warm my feet are cold Death is a movin upon my soul

Oh death how you’re treatin me You close my eyes so I can’t see
Well you’re hurtin my body you make me cold You run my life right out of my soul

Oh death please consider my age Please don’t take me at this stage
My wealth is all at your command If you’ll remove your icy hands

Oh the young the rich or poor All alike to me you know
No wealth no land no silver or gold Nothin satisfies my but your soul

Oh death, oh death
Won’t you spare me over til another year
Won’t you spare me over til another year
Won’t you spare me over til another year


“In The Midst Of Life We Are In Death”

from Magill’s Quotations:

Context: According to The Order for the Burial of the Dead from The Book of Common Prayer, while the body is being made ready to be placed in the grave, there shall be said or sung, by those standing by, the anthem from which this quotation is taken. This anthem, retaining the medieval sense of awe and dread in the presence of death, acknowledges this sense as a judgment upon our sins from whose bitter pains we may be spared by the mercy of our Saviour and Judge. The anthem, one of the few survivals of the medieval spirit in the Prayer Book offices of the dead, is as follows:

Man, that is born of a woman, hath but a short time to live, and is full of misery. He cometh up, and is cut down, like a flower; he fleeth as it were a shadow, and never continueth in one stay. In the midst of life we are in death; of whom may we seek for succour, but of thee, O Lord, who for our sins art justly displeased? Yet, O Lord God most holy, O Lord most mighty, O holy and most merciful Saviour, deliver us not into the bitter pains of eternal death.
Thou knowest, Lord, the secrets of our hearts; shut not thy merciful ears to our prayer; but spare us, Lord most holy, O God most mighty, O holy and merciful Saviour, thou most worthy Judge eternal, suffer us not, at our last hour, for any pains of death, to fall from thee.


Yours in the Lord,

jm
 

ReformedChristian

Puritan Board Freshman
Some old school music with a tad bit of Bible and history thrown in.

But God will redeem my soul from the power of the grave: for he shall receive me. Selah. Psalm 49.15

“O Death, also known as O, Death, Oh Death and Conversations with Death, is a traditional American folk song. In 2004, the Journal of Folklore Research asserted that “O, Death” is Lloyd Chandler’s song “A Conversation with Death”, which Chandler performed in the 1920s while preaching in Appalachia.” – Wiki

Lyrics:

Oh death, oh death
Won’t you spare me over til another year

Well what is this that I can’t see With ice cold hands taking hold of me
Well I am death none can excel I’ll open the door to heaven or hell

Whoa death someone would pray Could you wait to call me til another day
The children pray the preacher preached Time and mercy is out of your reach

I’ll fix your feet til you can’t walk I’ll lock your jaw til you can’t talk
I’ll close your eyes so you can’t see This very hour come and go with me

In death I come to take the soul Leave the body and leave it cold
To drop the flesh off of the frame The earth and worms both have a claim

Oh death, oh death
Won’t you spare me over til another year

My mother came to my bed Place a cold towel upon my head
My head is warm my feet are cold Death is a movin upon my soul

Oh death how you’re treatin me You close my eyes so I can’t see
Well you’re hurtin my body you make me cold You run my life right out of my soul

Oh death please consider my age Please don’t take me at this stage
My wealth is all at your command If you’ll remove your icy hands

Oh the young the rich or poor All alike to me you know
No wealth no land no silver or gold Nothin satisfies my but your soul

Oh death, oh death
Won’t you spare me over til another year
Won’t you spare me over til another year
Won’t you spare me over til another year


“In The Midst Of Life We Are In Death”

from Magill’s Quotations:

Context: According to The Order for the Burial of the Dead from The Book of Common Prayer, while the body is being made ready to be placed in the grave, there shall be said or sung, by those standing by, the anthem from which this quotation is taken. This anthem, retaining the medieval sense of awe and dread in the presence of death, acknowledges this sense as a judgment upon our sins from whose bitter pains we may be spared by the mercy of our Saviour and Judge. The anthem, one of the few survivals of the medieval spirit in the Prayer Book offices of the dead, is as follows:

Man, that is born of a woman, hath but a short time to live, and is full of misery. He cometh up, and is cut down, like a flower; he fleeth as it were a shadow, and never continueth in one stay. In the midst of life we are in death; of whom may we seek for succour, but of thee, O Lord, who for our sins art justly displeased? Yet, O Lord God most holy, O Lord most mighty, O holy and most merciful Saviour, deliver us not into the bitter pains of eternal death.
Thou knowest, Lord, the secrets of our hearts; shut not thy merciful ears to our prayer; but spare us, Lord most holy, O God most mighty, O holy and merciful Saviour, thou most worthy Judge eternal, suffer us not, at our last hour, for any pains of death, to fall from thee.


Yours in the Lord,

jm

I believe this song was also used in the movie Oh Brother Where Art Thou :)
 
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